economics

noun

eco·​nom·​ics ˌe-kə-ˈnä-miks How to pronounce economics (audio) ˌē-kə- How to pronounce economics (audio)
plural in form but singular or plural in construction
1
a
: a social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services
b
: economic theory, principles, or practices
sound economics
2
: economic aspect or significance
the economics of building a new stadium
3
: economic conditions
current economics

Examples of economics in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web And yet, some economists, reviving the attitudes of Keynes and Tolstoy, have appeared more open to the idea that economics is a branch of political philosophy. Nick Romeo, The New Yorker, 16 Jan. 2024 View Posts → Joseph Lawler 4044 articles Joseph Lawler is the policy editor for the Washington Examiner, having previously been an economics reporter. Hugo Gurdon, Washington Examiner, 15 Dec. 2023 This means backing an economics professor at the University of Southern California who was directed to stay away from campus when a controversy erupted over his anti-Hamas remarks to pro-Palestinian student protesters. Emily Bobrow, WSJ, 1 Dec. 2023 In this installment of the 538 Politics podcast, Galen speaks with Joanne Hsu, who directs the University of Michigan consumer sentiment survey, and Neale Mahoney, economics professor at Stanford University. Galen Druke, ABC News, 1 Feb. 2024 After all, the Knights senior takes an honors economics class. Glae Thien, San Diego Union-Tribune, 29 Jan. 2024 Yardeni doesn’t run an investment bank, offering instead something more like a boutique sell-side investment consulting firm, but his years of experience as a chief investment strategist, economics professor, and Fed economist have earned him a reputation as one of Wall Street’s top analysts. Will Daniel, Fortune, 22 Jan. 2024 Most students don’t actually pay the full cost of attendance — the sticker price — that colleges post on their websites, according to Phillip Levine, an economics professor at Wellesley College who has studied college pricing. The New York Times, New York Times, 12 Jan. 2024 The economics profession values economists for being able to translate observable reality into elegant mathematical equations, which the rest of us don’t care two hoots about. Timothy Noah, The New Republic, 16 Oct. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'economics.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

earlier oeconomicks "science or art of managing a household" from oeconomick, economike in same sense (Middle English iconomique, borrowed from Middle French yconomique, borrowed from Medieval Latin economica, feminine singular or neuter plural of oeconomicus "relating to the management of a household") + -ics — more at economic

Note: Compare ancient Greek oikonomikḗ "practice of household, administrative or economic management," oikonomiká (neuter plural) "administrative affairs."

First Known Use

1792, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of economics was in 1792

Dictionary Entries Near economics

Cite this Entry

“Economics.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/economics. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

economics

noun singular or plural
ec·​o·​nom·​ics
ˌek-ə-ˈnäm-iks,
ˌē-kə-
1
: a social science concerned with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services
2
: financial considerations
the economics of buying a house
economist
i-ˈkän-ə-məst
noun

More from Merriam-Webster on economics

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