dragon

noun
drag·​on | \ ˈdra-gən How to pronounce dragon (audio) \

Definition of dragon

1 archaic : a huge serpent
2 : a mythical animal usually represented as a monstrous winged and scaly serpent or saurian with a crested head and enormous claws
3 : a violent, combative, or very strict person
4 capitalized : draco
5 : something or someone formidable or baneful

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Other Words from dragon

dragonish \ ˈdra-​gə-​nish How to pronounce dragon (audio) \ adjective

Examples of dragon in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web When his home is threatened by humans, a young dragon summons the courage to seek a mythical paradise where dragons can live in peace and fly free. Jacob Siegal, BGR, 5 Sep. 2021 Shang-Chi just rode a dragon, met his extended family in an otherworldly village, inherited 10 magical rings from his antagonistic father, defeated a soul-sucking monster and saved the world. Brian Truitt, USA TODAY, 4 Sep. 2021 Her jeans also featured another dragon painted along her left pant leg. Manori Ravindran, Variety, 4 Sep. 2021 In the 12th century, reports from China suggested ambergris was dried dragon spittle. Smithsonian Magazine, 2 Sep. 2021 The Big 12 could help itself by helping to raise up a fire-breathing dragon of a football team in one of the most coveted footprints for college football in the country. Joseph Goodman | Jgoodman@al.com, al, 28 Aug. 2021 At one point, a dragon—a dragon!—shows up. Like the Ten Rings, these disparate elements constantly threaten to careen out of orbit; some moments in the film seem overwhelmed by the business of world building. Shirley Li, The Atlantic, 23 Aug. 2021 The lava here had an uneven, ominously scaly appearance, like glitchy dragon skin, and loomed ten feet overhead. Heidi Julavit, The New Yorker, 16 Aug. 2021 The sculpture features 304 stainless steel bones, a base handmade from steel and concrete, and the largest wingspan of any stainless steel dragon in the world (40 feet, 4 inches), according to a news release. Anna Caplan, Dallas News, 7 Aug. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dragon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dragon

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dragon

Middle English, from Anglo-French dragun, from Latin dracon-, draco serpent, dragon, from Greek drakōn serpent; akin to Old English torht bright, Greek derkesthai to see, look at

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Time Traveler for dragon

Time Traveler

The first known use of dragon was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near dragon

dragoman

dragon

dragon's blood

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Statistics for dragon

Last Updated

9 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Dragon.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dragon. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for dragon

dragon

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dragon

: an imaginary animal that can breathe out fire and looks like a very large lizard with wings, a long tail, and large claws

dragon

noun
drag·​on | \ ˈdra-gən How to pronounce dragon (audio) \

Kids Definition of dragon

: an imaginary animal usually pictured as a huge serpent or lizard with wings and large claws

More from Merriam-Webster on dragon

Nglish: Translation of dragon for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dragon

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