dragon

noun
drag·​on | \ˈdra-gən \

Definition of dragon 

1 archaic : a huge serpent

2 : a mythical animal usually represented as a monstrous winged and scaly serpent or saurian with a crested head and enormous claws

3 : a violent, combative, or very strict person

4 capitalized : draco

5 : something or someone formidable or baneful

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Other Words from dragon

dragonish \ -​gə-​nish \ adjective

Examples of dragon in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Like, sorry am not a dragon or whatever or whatever is on those games. Fox News, "Gutfeld: Be nicer. It will drive your enemies nuts," 5 Aug. 2018 Ben is also an opera fan who owns a pet bearded dragon named Mutombo, according to Complex. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "A Complete Relationship Timeline of Kendall Jenner and Ben Simmons," 23 July 2018 This was a sweet slush of dragon fruit, almond milk, pineapple and mango, topped with granola, blueberry, sliced banana and shredded coconut. Alex Kiesig, idahostatesman, "'I love this city': Eat your way through the Capital City Public Market," 6 July 2018 As Natasha Frost at Atlas Obscura puts it, the 16th-century carving of St. George charging a dragon now better resembles a Pixar character. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Restorationist Botches 16th-Century Spanish Statue of Saint," 28 June 2018 Maquia’s abduction is terrifyingly rendered aboard a defective dragon that glows red-hot before crashing in a forested land. Deborah Young, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms': Film Review | Shanghai 2018," 27 June 2018 The title references a figure in the Book of Revelation — a pregnant woman threatened by a dragon — and the many paintings done of her over the centuries. Tim Smith, baltimoresun.com, "BSO New Music Festival filled with eclectic works, electric performances," 26 June 2018 Staff encountered a foot-long bearded dragon basking in the sun on a rock near Bascom Hall. Lainey Seyler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "University of Wisconsin staff find a bearded dragon sunning itself near Bascom Hall," 25 May 2018 As a sound like a dragon’s roar emerged from the fog, the valley ahead of us remained unlit, its dense, medieval haze instead rippling with the sound of rocket engines. Geoff Manaugh, The Atlantic, "Los Angeles, America’s Future Spaceport," 17 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dragon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dragon

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dragon

Middle English, from Anglo-French dragun, from Latin dracon-, draco serpent, dragon, from Greek drakōn serpent; akin to Old English torht bright, Greek derkesthai to see, look at

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Statistics for dragon

Last Updated

20 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dragon

The first known use of dragon was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for dragon

dragon

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dragon

: an imaginary animal that can breathe out fire and looks like a very large lizard with wings, a long tail, and large claws

dragon

noun
drag·​on | \ˈdra-gən \

Kids Definition of dragon

: an imaginary animal usually pictured as a huge serpent or lizard with wings and large claws

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Comments on dragon

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