downside

noun
down·​side | \ ˈdau̇n-ˌsīd How to pronounce downside (audio) \

Definition of downside

1 : a downward trend (as of prices)
2 : a negative aspect the downside of fame

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Examples of downside in a Sentence

He could find no downside to the car. the downside of living in the country is, of course, the long commute to work
Recent Examples on the Web The sad story of the U.S. steel industry demonstrates the huge downside of the former approach and ought to raise serious doubts as to the feasibility of achieving the latter . . . Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "Another Twist of the Knife: Introducing a New Death Tax," 1 May 2021 The downside to complete seclusion however, is that there are very few other travelers or guests on the island, which means there's no public restaurant, bar, or lounge. Kimberly Wilson, Travel + Leisure, "This Private Island Resort Has 7 Stunning Villas With Private Chefs, Personal Butlers, and More," 1 May 2021 Most of the activity the market saw over the past five years was the completion of existing projects and the downside of that curve. Ellen Paris, Forbes, "PMG Founder Kevin Maloney On South Florida’s Luxury Real Estate Market," 28 Apr. 2021 Another downside is the reality of difficult weather: poor conditions are a regular disruption for any sort of balloon work over the Antarctic ice sheet. Katrina Miller, Scientific American, "Searching for the Universe’s Most Energetic Particles, Astronomers Turn on the Radio," 27 Apr. 2021 Brugler, in his scouting report, also noted the potential downside. Mike Rodak | Mrodak@al.com, al, "Christian Barmore viewed as boom-or-bust prospect by NFL draft analysts," 23 Apr. 2021 The downside of what could be one of the night’s warmest wins is that her competitor Close is about to face her eighth acting loss, tying the record. New York Times, "Oscars 2021 Predictions: Who Will Win Best Picture, Actor and Actress?," 22 Apr. 2021 But the bank has faced questions in the wake of the debacle over whether managers prioritized boosting revenue over managing against downside. Marion Halftermeyer, Fortune, "Credit Suisse’s risk chief was also the chief sales person before Archegos collapsed," 22 Apr. 2021 New research from Microsoft shows the potential downside of the virtual workplace, confirming that stress increases over the course of back-to-back virtual meetings. Bruce Rogers, Forbes, "Our Brains Need Breaks From Virtual Meetings," 20 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'downside.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of downside

1905, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for downside

Time Traveler

The first known use of downside was in 1905

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Statistics for downside

Last Updated

7 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Downside.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/downside. Accessed 11 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for downside

downside

noun

English Language Learners Definition of downside

: a part of something that you do not want or like : a drawback or disadvantage

More from Merriam-Webster on downside

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for downside

Nglish: Translation of downside for Spanish Speakers

Comments on downside

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