dormancy

noun
dor·​man·​cy | \ ˈdȯr-mən(t)-sē How to pronounce dormancy (audio) \

Definition of dormancy

: the quality or state of being dormant

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Examples of dormancy in a Sentence

some volcanoes have eruptive cycles marked by long stretches of dormancy a fighting force that could be roused instantly from dormancy to action
Recent Examples on the Web After decades of dormancy, the ERA campaign picked up steam amid the #MeToo movement. Jess Bravin, WSJ, "States Seek Ruling on Equal Rights Amendment Ratification Deadline," 30 Jan. 2020 After a period of near dormancy, the fire began to grow rapidly again about two weeks ago, pushed by strong winds. Tegan Hanlon, Anchorage Daily News, "Groceries delayed, reservations canceled as the Swan Lake fire tangles traffic on the Sterling Highway," 31 Aug. 2019 Onion sets are little bulbs that have been forced into dormancy and then are sold in packages at the nursery. Pam Peirce, SFChronicle.com, "What you need to know before you plant onions," 13 Dec. 2019 After its first flush of growth, tea trees go into dormancy. New York Times, "Savoring the Taste of Memories in Northern India," 29 Oct. 2019 Provide a cold and moist treatment to break down the internal, chemical dormancy. Paul Cappiello, The Courier-Journal, "Aye, aye Buckeye. Here's the secret to growing a tree from seed in your Kentucky backyard," 1 Nov. 2019 The Old Post Office, at 433 W. Van Buren, recently has emerged from more than two decades of dormancy to one of the most impressive leasing runs in recent memory. Ryan Ori, chicagotribune.com, "PepsiCo’s Chicago office to go from 17 floors to one, in move to ultrawide Old Post Office," 21 Nov. 2019 Deciduous trees then reveal their true colors before shedding leaves in preparation for winter dormancy. cleveland, "Cleveland Metroparks east and west offer vivid fall foliage," 14 Oct. 2019 The history of Maryland playing football against Penn State has been dominated by two recurring themes: relatively long periods of dormancy, including one 16-year break and another that lasted 21 years, and the total domination by the Nittany Lions. Don Markus, baltimoresun.com, "‘More a recruiting rivalry’: Maryland football has more than a win at stake vs. No. 12 Penn State," 26 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dormancy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dormancy

1789, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for dormancy

Time Traveler

The first known use of dormancy was in 1789

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Statistics for dormancy

Last Updated

7 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Dormancy.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dormancy. Accessed 19 Feb. 2020.

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