dopamine

noun
do·​pa·​mine | \ ˈdō-pə-ˌmēn How to pronounce dopamine (audio) \

Definition of dopamine

: a monoamine C8H11NO2 that is a decarboxylated form of dopa and that occurs especially as a neurotransmitter in the brain

Examples of dopamine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web One theory is that light intensity and time spent outdoors regulates the release of dopamine in the retina, which controls the growth of the eye. Olivia Killeen, The Conversation, "Increasing screen time during COVID-19 could be harmful to kids’ eyesight," 21 May 2020 Hormones like serotonin and dopamine can be produced to help regulate mood. Kendall Cornish, Travel + Leisure, "The Benefits of Scented Candles According to a Psychotherapist," 16 May 2020 The fact that Lopez sought out biologist Kwang-Soo Kim of McLean Hospital, who created the dopamine-producing neurons that were transplanted into Lopez, reduces ethical concerns about patient exploitation. Sharon Begley, STAT, "Ethics questions swirl around historic Parkinson’s experiment," 14 May 2020 Chocolate also contains a neurotransmitter known as anandamide, which can alter dopamine levels in the brain, causing a sense of peace and relaxation. Kimberly Wilson, Essence, "Feeling Down? These Foods Are Certified To Boost Your Mood," 2 May 2020 Studies have shown a direct link between solving a puzzle and the release of dopamine in the brain. Andrew Hetherington, Popular Mechanics, "Pancakes, Euphoria, and a Robot Parade: Inside MIT's Grueling Puzzle Competition," 12 Mar. 2020 More so, eating a handful of M&M’s causes neurons in the brain to release dopamine, a neurotransmitter crucial to the brain’s motivation system. New York Times, "In Defense of a Good Cry, and Other Options for ‘Losing It’," 7 May 2020 Daily texts give you bursts of dopamine, the brain chemical connected to arousal. Damona Hoffman, Los Angeles Times, "L.A.’s love coach answers the 7 most common coronavirus dating questions," 1 May 2020 These behaviors provide dopamine beyond the givers and the receivers—to all who share their emotionally uplifting stories. Popular Science, "Why we evolved to feel empathy during pandemics and other disasters," 28 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dopamine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dopamine

1959, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dopamine

dopa + amine

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Time Traveler for dopamine

Time Traveler

The first known use of dopamine was in 1959

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Statistics for dopamine

Last Updated

26 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Dopamine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dopamine. Accessed 31 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for dopamine

dopamine

noun
do·​pa·​mine | \ ˈdō-pə-ˌmēn How to pronounce dopamine (audio) \

Medical Definition of dopamine

: a monoamine C8H11NO2 that is a decarboxylated form of dopa and occurs especially as a neurotransmitter in the brain and as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of epinephrine — see intropin

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More from Merriam-Webster on dopamine

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with dopamine

Nglish: Translation of dopamine for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dopamine

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