dogma

noun
dog·​ma | \ ˈdȯg-mə How to pronounce dogma (audio) , ˈdäg- \
plural dogmas also dogmata\ ˈdȯg-​mə-​tə How to pronounce dogmata (audio) , ˈdäg-​ \

Definition of dogma

1a : something held as an established opinion especially : a definite authoritative tenet
b : a code of such tenets pedagogical dogma
c : a point of view or tenet put forth as authoritative without adequate grounds
2 : a doctrine or body of doctrines concerning faith or morals formally stated and authoritatively proclaimed by a church

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Synonyms for dogma

Synonyms

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Did You Know?

Religious dogma and scientific dogma are sometimes at odds, as in arguments between those who believe in the biblical story of creation and those who believe in evolution. Since all dogma resists change, arguments of any kind are harder to resolve when both sides are dogmatic in their beliefs. Dogma and dogmatic are generally used disapprovingly; it's always other people who believe unquestioningly in dogma and who take a dogmatic approach to important issues.

Examples of dogma in a Sentence

The Saudi regime has tried to deflect questions about its management of the country … by supporting and spreading an uncompromising religious dogma. — Fareed Zakaria, Newsweek, 1 Oct. 2001 He was known for his ability to burst the bubble of generally accepted dogma, to puncture it with data and detached observations. — Sherwin B. Nuland, New Republic, 19 Feb. 2001 It had long been biological dogma that whales were scarce in the open ocean, but the Navy was picking up whale songs thousands of miles from land. — Sharon Begley et al., Newsweek, 31 Jan. 2000 For in creating a cultural orthodoxy designed to combat racism, urban disorder, and a legacy of oppression, we subject ourselves to delusional dogma, the tyranny of conformity … — Gerald Early, Harper's, January 1997 These new findings challenge the current dogma in the field. the Catholic dogma of the bodily assumption of the Virgin Mary
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Recent Examples on the Web This dubious encroachment of psychological dogma on the culture is in itself toxic. WSJ, "Toxic Psychology Interferes With Letting Boys Be Boys," 7 Aug. 2018 For one thing, Trump is acting in flagrant defiance of longstanding Republican party dogma, which has for better or worse endorsed free trade as an unmitigated good. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Paul Ryan Unaware Constitution Lets Congress Override Presidential Veto," 12 July 2018 The consequences of this practice were serious: An illegitimate child was a legal nonentity, like an unbaptized child under old-school Catholic dogma. New York Times, "In This Korean Best Seller, a Young Mother Is Driven to Psychosis," 14 Apr. 2020 Prejudice and dogma are structural vulnerabilities. Laurie Penny, Wired, "Panic, Pandemic, and the Body Politic," 14 Mar. 2020 Unfortunately, a lot of the dogma that we were fed for decades came out of advertisements. Benjamin Vanhoose, PEOPLE.com, "Mark Wahlberg Debates With Dr. Oz Over Whether to Eat Breakfast or Not," 22 Jan. 2020 In Marxian dogma, a society’s class structure is determined by underlying, impersonal forces, technology and the modes of production that technology dictates. New York Times, "9 New Books We Recommend This Week," 19 Mar. 2020 Stars Are Made of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin by Donovan Moore Harvard University Press, 2020 ($29.95) Overturning scientific dogma is no easy thing—especially as a marginalized minority. Andrea Gawrylewski, Scientific American, "Recommended Books, March 2020," 22 Feb. 2020 This message is now dogma for news outlets and public health officials. Roxanne Khamsi, Wired, "They Say Coronavirus Isn't Airborne—but It's Definitely Borne By Air," 14 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dogma.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dogma

1534, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for dogma

Latin dogmat-, dogma, from Greek, from dokein to seem — more at decent

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Time Traveler for dogma

Time Traveler

The first known use of dogma was in 1534

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Statistics for dogma

Last Updated

12 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Dogma.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dogma. Accessed 31 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for dogma

dogma

noun
How to pronounce dogma (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of dogma

formal
usually disapproving : a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of a group without being questioned or doubted
: a belief or set of beliefs that is taught by a religious organization

dogma

noun
dog·​ma | \ ˈdȯg-mə How to pronounce dogma (audio) \

Kids Definition of dogma

1 : something firmly believed She repeated medical dogma against eating sugar.
2 : a belief or set of beliefs taught by a church

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