disciple

noun
dis·​ci·​ple | \ di-ˈsī-pəl How to pronounce disciple (audio) \

Definition of disciple

1 : one who accepts and assists in spreading the doctrines of another: such as
a Christianity : one of the twelve in the inner circle of Christ's followers according to the Gospel accounts
b : a convinced adherent of a school or individual a disciple of Freud
2 capitalized, Christianity : a member of the Disciples of Christ founded in the U.S. in 1809 that holds the Bible alone to be the rule of faith and practice, usually baptizes by immersion, and has a congregational (see congregational sense 3) polity

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Other Words from disciple

discipleship \ di-​ˈsī-​pəl-​ˌship How to pronounce disciple (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disciple

follower, adherent, disciple, partisan mean one who gives full loyalty and support to another. follower may apply to people who attach themselves either to the person or beliefs of another. an evangelist and his followers adherent suggests a close and persistent attachment. adherents to Marxism disciple implies a devoted allegiance to the teachings of one chosen as a master. disciples of Gandhi partisan suggests a zealous often prejudiced attachment. partisans of the President

Examples of disciple in a Sentence

a disciple of Sigmund Freud a circle of dedicated disciples who conscientiously wrote down everything the prophet said
Recent Examples on the Web Like Jensen, Moser is another Majerus disciple, having coached at Saint Louis under him from 2007-11. Josh Newman, The Salt Lake Tribune, "It’s unclear if there’s a frontrunner for the Utah basketball job, but there are candidates that make sense," 22 Mar. 2021 Also a Smith disciple, Doherty, who had spent one season at Notre Dame before taking the job in Chapel Hill. Eddie Timanus, USA TODAY, "Five reasons North Carolina tapped Hubert Davis as its next men's basketball coach," 6 Apr. 2021 Travis Tritt, Jimmie Vaughan, Larkin Poe, Guthrie Trapp, and Tim Montana, a disciple of Gibbons and a frequent collaborator, will also appear. Joseph Hudak, Rolling Stone, "Billy Gibbons Tribute Concert to Feature Eric Church, Lucinda Williams," 20 Apr. 2021 Chris Beard, a Bob Knight disciple, was able to turn the Red Raiders into a contender — reaching the national championship game in 2019. Scott Gleeson, USA TODAY, "College basketball's way-too-early men's preseason top 25 for 2021-22," 6 Apr. 2021 Ecuadoreans face a runoff between conservative businessman Guillermo Lasso and Andrés Arauz, a disciple of former leftist President Rafael Correa. Star Tribune, "Ecuador, Peru to elect presidents amid strengthened pandemic," 8 Apr. 2021 Michael Jordan’s childhood idol, David Thompson, is another Baylor disciple, someone who had their eyes opened to what basketball could be by the Lakers’ legend. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, "NBA legends like Dr. J agree: Elgin Baylor revolutionized game," 23 Mar. 2021 Gates is a disciple of Leonard Hamilton, who runs a terrific program at Florida State. Terry Pluto, cleveland, "Can Cleveland State build on its trip to the NCAA tournament? Terry Pluto," 20 Mar. 2021 After cooking complex Mediterranean dishes for much of his culinary career, Abur is now a disciple of the Chipotle-fication of food. Phillip Valys, sun-sentinel.com, "First look: Olive U, Naked Taco, Lynora’s Kitchen, Sloan’s Ice Cream opening at buzzy Uptown Boca complex," 18 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disciple.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disciple

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for disciple

Middle English, "follower of Jesus, one of the apostles, pupil," in part going back to Old English discipul, in part borrowed from Anglo-French disciple, both borrowed from Late Latin discipulus "follower of Christ, apostle" (translation of Greek mathētḗs), going back to Latin, "pupil, learner," of uncertain origin

Note: Traditionally explained as a derivative of discere "to learn," but the second element -pulus is neither a known word nor a suffix. According to an alternative explanation, the base is nominalized from an unattested verb *discipere, putatively, "to grasp, comprehend," from dis- dis- and capere "to take, seize" (cf. disceptāre "to dispute, debate," supposedly a frequentative from this verb); this is semantically questionable, however, and -ulus is any case not an agentive suffix.

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Time Traveler for disciple

Time Traveler

The first known use of disciple was before the 12th century

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Last Updated

18 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Disciple.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disciple. Accessed 18 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for disciple

disciple

noun

English Language Learners Definition of disciple

: someone who accepts and helps to spread the teachings of a famous person
: one of a group of 12 men who were sent out to spread the teachings of Jesus Christ

disciple

noun
dis·​ci·​ple | \ di-ˈsī-pəl How to pronounce disciple (audio) \

Kids Definition of disciple

1 : a person who accepts and helps to spread the teachings of another
2 : apostle

Comments on disciple

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