dehydrate

verb

de·​hy·​drate (ˌ)dē-ˈhī-ˌdrāt How to pronounce dehydrate (audio)
dehydrated; dehydrating; dehydrates

transitive verb

1
a
: to remove bound water or hydrogen and oxygen from (a chemical compound) in the proportion in which they form water
b
: to remove water from (something, such as a food)
2
: to deprive of vitality or savor

intransitive verb

: to lose water or body fluids
dehydrator noun

Did you know?

Dehydrating food is a good way to preserve it; raisins, which are dehydrated grapes, are a good example. Dehydration through industrial processes makes it possible to keep food even longer and store it in a smaller space. Freeze-drying produces food that only needs rehydration—that is, the addition of water—to restore its original consistency. Runners, cyclists, and hikers fearful of dehydration seem to be constantly hydrating themselves nowadays, sometimes even using a shoulder pack with a tube going straight into the mouth. Dehydrate can also be used for making something "dry" or "lifeless;" thus, a dull teacher can dehydrate American history, and an unimaginative staging can dehydrate a great Shakespeare play.

Examples of dehydrate in a Sentence

Salt dehydrates the meat and keeps it from spoiling. Athletes drink lots of water so they don't dehydrate. Exercising in this heat will dehydrate you.
Recent Examples on the Web He wasn't dehydrated or injured — only sunburned, Smelley said. Charlotte Phillipp, Peoplemag, 31 Mar. 2024 Nearly 38 percent were dehydrated, and 30 percent were saponified, a chemical process that produces a preservative substance known as grave wax from fats in the body. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 20 Mar. 2024 Caffeine itself can have a dehydrating effect, but this is offset by the amount of the drink. Sheah Rarback, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 It can be steamed, roasted, or fried, or dehydrated into a useful flour. Zoë Schlanger, The Atlantic, 28 Mar. 2024 Just glide some on to condition and rejuvenate lips dehydrated by a day in the sun. Barbara Bellesi Zito, Travel + Leisure, 15 Mar. 2024 For people who are dehydrated, the easiest way to boost skin appearance would be to drink more water. Jani Hall, Health, 21 Feb. 2024 Coastal winter-weather patterns plaster the state’s enormous peaks with a magical maritime snow that dehydrates into a velvety surface with unfathomable stability, even on super-steep slopes. Jen Murphy, Robb Report, 3 Feb. 2024 Hall said when his son was found, he was severely dehydrated, hungry and covered in filth. Theresa Vargas, Washington Post, 6 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'dehydrate.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1876, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of dehydrate was in 1876

Dictionary Entries Near dehydrate

Cite this Entry

“Dehydrate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dehydrate. Accessed 21 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

dehydrate

verb
de·​hy·​drate (ˈ)dē-ˈhī-ˌdrāt How to pronounce dehydrate (audio)
1
: to remove water from (as foods)
2
: to lose water or body fluids
dehydration
ˌdē-ˌhī-ˈdrā-shən
noun

Medical Definition

dehydrate

verb
de·​hy·​drate (ˈ)dē-ˈhī-ˌdrāt How to pronounce dehydrate (audio)
dehydrated; dehydrating

transitive verb

1
: to remove bound water or hydrogen and oxygen from (a chemical compound) in the proportion in which they form water
2
: to remove water from (as foods)

intransitive verb

: to lose water or body fluids
dehydrator noun

More from Merriam-Webster on dehydrate

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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