croon

verb

crooned; crooning; croons

intransitive verb

1
chiefly Scotland : bellow, boom
2
: to sing or speak in a gentle murmuring manner
The mother crooned as she rocked the baby.
especially : to sing in a soft intimate manner adapted to amplifying systems

transitive verb

: to sing (something, such as a popular song or a lullaby) in a crooning manner
croons ballads that conjure up the tenderness of puppy love …Joan Morgan
croon noun

Examples of croon in a Sentence

The mother crooned as she rocked the baby.
Recent Examples on the Web There is nothing scary about this lonely clown filling the air with melodic cover songs and treating your eardrums to crooning comparable to any Grammy winner. Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times, 26 Apr. 2024 The emotional track finds the eight-time Grammy winner adding her famous vibrato to poetic lyrics penned by Charlie Midnight, crooning over cinematic piano and strings. Hannah Dailey, Billboard, 25 Apr. 2024 Eventually his Fall Guy co-star, Emily Blunt, arrived to guide him back on track but instead got sucked into the song too, crooning about playing an alcoholic wife in the Academy Award–winning Oppenheimer. Esther Zuckerman, The Atlantic, 14 Apr. 2024 As for the ceremonial parts of the visit, no word yet on whether the prime minister will follow his South Korean counterpart by crooning an iconic American song at the state dinner on Wednesday. Motoko Rich, New York Times, 7 Apr. 2024 This laidback track in which Bey croons about her affinity for her life partner and husband Jay-Z, featuring Post Malone, is deserving of a look that feels not too flashy. Robyn Mowatt, Essence, 1 Apr. 2024 Levert and Ryan slow danced onstage as Smyers played acoustic guitar and Mooney crooned the heartfelt ballad. USA TODAY, 12 Mar. 2024 Singer Shug Avery croons a beautiful blues song to Celie, the story’s main character, in a juke joint. Korsha Wilson, Bon Appétit, 11 Mar. 2024 In a TikTok video of the performance, Combs — consulting his phone for the lyrics to the verses — crooned the country ballad as the crowd shouted along. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 8 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'croon.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English croynen, from Middle Dutch cronen; akin to Old High German crōnen to chatter

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of croon was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near croon

Cite this Entry

“Croon.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/croon. Accessed 19 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

croon

verb
: to hum or sing in a low soft voice
croon a lullaby
croon noun
crooner noun

More from Merriam-Webster on croon

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