credo

noun
cre·do | \ˈkrē-(ˌ)dō, ˈkrā- \
plural credos

Definition of credo 

: creed The CEO's credo was "If you don't go forward, you go backward."

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Did You Know?

Credo comes straight from the Latin word meaning "I believe", and is the first word of many religious credos, or creeds, such as the Apostles' Creed and the Nicene Creed. But the word can be applied to any guiding principle or set of principles. Of course, you may choose a different credo when you're 52 than when you're 19. But here is the credo of the writer H. L. Mencken, written after he had lived quite a few years: "I believe that it is better to tell the truth than to lie. I believe that it is better to be free than to be a slave. And I believe that it is better to know than to be ignorant".

Examples of credo in a Sentence

the credo of the ancient Egyptians involved a variety of polytheism we must abide by the simple credo that “The customer is always right”

Recent Examples on the Web

Combining elements of the Bill of Rights with the presiding credo of the New Deal, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms were initially meant to counter the arguments of the American isolationist movement. J.s. Marcus, WSJ, "In New York, Rockwell’s Vision of FDR’s ‘Freedoms’," 12 May 2018 Conversations about big expenses often ended with the same happy credo. Joyce Wadler, New York Times, "Farewell, My Lovely Inheritance," 25 Apr. 2018 With Aries energy lighting up your zone of self-sufficient power moves, this is the week to step up to the podium and declare this credo to the world. Bess Matassa, Teen Vogue, "Weekly Horoscopes April 9–15," 7 Apr. 2018 Bahama House Harbour Island has its fair share of chic boutique hotels, but Bahama House stands out for its emphasis on custom-crafted, adrenalized activities on and off the beach, in line with owner Eleven Experiences’ adventure-seeking credo. Cnt Editors, Condé Nast Traveler, "Best New Hotels in the World," 1 May 2018 That was always taught to me as the credo of the free press. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Michelle Wolf Is a Hero," 30 Apr. 2018 That credo was tested in the early 1970s, as many Republicans felt compelled to resist or disavow President Richard Nixon amid the Watergate scandal. Jeet Heer, The New Republic, "Trump’s Loyalists Are Following in Reagan’s Footsteps," 20 Mar. 2018 Then there's his credo for the UCLA defense, which requires only one word and speaks for itself. Ben Bolch, latimes.com, "UCLA's defense is tackling a fundamental assignment in an attempt to improve," 13 Mar. 2018 Well, the modern administration is not listening to that credo. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, "Agent Scott Boras: 'Non-competitive cancer' ruining baseball," 29 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'credo.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of credo

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for credo

Middle English, from Latin, I believe

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Statistics for credo

Last Updated

16 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for credo

The first known use of credo was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for credo

credo

noun

English Language Learners Definition of credo

: an idea or set of beliefs that guides the actions of a person or group

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evasion of direct action or statement

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