conquest

noun
con·​quest | \ ˈkän-ˌkwest How to pronounce conquest (audio) , ˈkäŋ-; ˈkäŋ-kwəst \

Definition of conquest

1 : the act or process of conquering
2a : something conquered especially : territory appropriated in war
b : a person whose favor or hand has been won

Examples of conquest in a Sentence

tales of the ancient army's conquests She was one of his many conquests. people who boast about their sexual conquests
Recent Examples on the Web As many see it, the Kremlin still has key military objectives, such as completing the conquest of the Donbas region, before returning to negotiations. Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, 26 July 2022 Dragon could, in theory, then leap decades forward in time, or backward, to chronicle other major events in the Targaryen dynasty with an entirely new cast — such as exploring Aegon’s conquest or the Doom of Valyria. James Hibberd, The Hollywood Reporter, 20 July 2022 Classical realism was born of the traumas of the Thirties, when two great powers, Nazi Germany and imperial Japan, considered the conquest of foreign territory vital to their futures. Daniel Bessner, Harper’s Magazine , 22 June 2022 The success of his plan does not hinge on overt conquest of neighboring states. Loren Thompson, Forbes, 21 June 2022 The film will follow Vaccaro’s conquest and introduce audiences to Jordan’s parents, in particular his powerful and dynamic mother, as well as former coaches, advisors, friends and those close to Jordan. Matt Donnelly, Variety, 19 Apr. 2022 Only when the British withdrew from Palestine in 1948, followed immediately by an all-out attempt by Arab states to crush the nascent Israel, did Israelis take up the sword in self-defense and go on to win land through military conquest. WSJ, 19 June 2022 The invaders are now directing most of their resources toward completing Russia's conquest of Luhansk, one of the two oblasts that make up the Donbas region, by capturing the city of Sievierodonetsk. Grayson Quay, The Week, 16 June 2022 Alphonse Molosa wandered into the thicket recently and clambered atop a conquest: a giant African coralwood tree lying on the forest floor, its bright orange insides bared. New York Times, 14 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conquest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of conquest

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for conquest

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesitus, alteration of Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquirere

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Time Traveler for conquest

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The first known use of conquest was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near conquest

conqueror

conquest

conquest state

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Statistics for conquest

Last Updated

9 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Conquest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conquest. Accessed 10 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for conquest

conquest

noun
con·​quest | \ ˈkän-ˌkwest How to pronounce conquest (audio) \

Kids Definition of conquest

1 : the act or process of getting or gaining especially by force
2 : something that is gotten or gained especially by force

More from Merriam-Webster on conquest

Nglish: Translation of conquest for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of conquest for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about conquest

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