conquest

noun
con·​quest | \ ˈkän-ˌkwest How to pronounce conquest (audio) , ˈkäŋ-; ˈkäŋ-kwəst\

Definition of conquest

1 : the act or process of conquering
2a : something conquered especially : territory appropriated in war
b : a person whose favor or hand has been won

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Examples of conquest in a Sentence

tales of the ancient army's conquests She was one of his many conquests. people who boast about their sexual conquests
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Recent Examples on the Web

Greek civilization went east in the wake of Alexander the Great’s conquests, and the American kind did in the wake of the Allied liberation of the Continent. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, "Europe and America Seventy-Five Years After D Day," 6 June 2019 Clarke ultimately looked back at Daenerys's evolution to contextualize her villainous turn from killing people in her conquests in Essos to losing her biggest allies on the other side of the Narrow Sea. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Emilia Clarke Was "Flabbergasted" by Daenerys Targaryen's Ending in Game of Thrones Season 8," 21 May 2019 Mexico City was founded in 1315 on an island in a lake, which was steadily drained following the 1521 Spanish conquest. Mark Stevenson, Fox News, "Protesters: New Mexico City airport will hurt environment," 23 Aug. 2018 Maya civilization began to decline shortly before Spanish conquest brought about a final, massive population crash 500 years ago. Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica, "Carbon impact of ancient Maya farming may still be felt," 22 Aug. 2018 Jünger, having been conscripted into his old regiment, shared in the conquest of his old French battlegrounds. Dominic Green, WSJ, "‘A German Officer in Occupied Paris’ Review: A Very Refined Occupation," 15 Feb. 2019 The first stage in Centineo’s conquest of the internet’s collective heart was to create a certain slippage between himself and Peter Kavinsky. Constance Grady, Vox, "Noah Centineo and the rise of the wholesome internet boyfriend, explained," 28 Sep. 2018 Trump said last week he had been told that the full territorial conquest to defeat the Islamic State could be completed in the coming week. Zeina Karam, The Seattle Times, "Fierce battles near final IS foothold in eastern Syria," 12 Feb. 2019 So in October, lawmakers passed another bill declaring tejo part of the national patrimony, noting that it was invented by local Muisca Indians long before the Spanish conquest. John Otis, WSJ, "Colombia Wants to Boost Its National Sport. That Might Mean Less Beer.," 4 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conquest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conquest

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for conquest

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesitus, alteration of Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquirere

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Statistics for conquest

Last Updated

12 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for conquest

The first known use of conquest was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for conquest

conquest

noun

English Language Learners Definition of conquest

: the act of taking control of a country, city, etc., through the use of force
: a country, city, etc., that an army has taken control of through the use of force
: a person someone has succeeded in having a romantic and especially a sexual relationship with

conquest

noun
con·​quest | \ ˈkän-ˌkwest How to pronounce conquest (audio) \

Kids Definition of conquest

1 : the act or process of getting or gaining especially by force
2 : something that is gotten or gained especially by force

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Comments on conquest

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