coauthor

noun
co·​au·​thor | \ (ˌ)kō-ˈȯ-thər How to pronounce coauthor (audio) \
variants: or co-author
plural coauthors or co-authors

Definition of coauthor

: one who collaborates with another person in authoring a literary or dramatic work, a document, a legislative bill, etc. coauthors of many books and plays the coauthors of new legislation

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Other Words from coauthor

coauthor or co-author transitive verb coauthored or co-authored; coauthoring or co-authoring
… he coauthored legislation … requiring the publication on the Internet of the cost of all federal contracts, grants, and congressional "earmarks,"… — Michael Tomasky a co-authored book
coauthorship \ (ˌ)kō-​ˈȯ-​thər-​ˌship How to pronounce coauthor (audio) \ or co-authorship noun
… accepting coauthorship on studies to which they did not significantly contribute. — Mary Murray

Examples of coauthor in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Bob Stern, coauthor of the state’s 1974 Political Reform Act, said Martinez Muela may have violated the prohibition on public officials accepting expensive gifts from individuals with an interest in influencing their decisions, such as lobbyists. Adam Elmahrek, Los Angeles Times, 24 July 2021 The technique can be applied to different locations along the leaf to track water flow, says Piyush Jain, a study coauthor and mechanical engineering PhD candidate at Cornell. Keith Gillogly, Wired, 2 July 2021 Scobie is the coauthor of Finding Freedom, a royal biography focused on Harry and Meghan's royal exit. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, 21 Aug. 2021 Ines Sousa, the supplier environmental impact program manager at Google and a coauthor on the new study, says there are a few challenges that still need to be overcome before that’s a reality. Maddie Stone, Wired, 7 Aug. 2021 Paul Sracic is a professor of politics and international relations at Youngstown State University and the coauthor of Ohio Politics and Government (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2015). Marnie Hunter, CNN, 5 Aug. 2021 As Mark Barabak wrote, Mann and his coauthor, Norman Ornstein, took a lot of criticism from people who called them alarmist. Los Angeles Times, 30 July 2021 That consistency with silicon devices is key, explains Catherine Ramsdale, a coauthor of the research and senior vice president of technology at PragmatIC, which designs and produces the flexible chips with Arm. Gregory Barber, Wired, 21 July 2021 Study coauthor Kristie Ebi works at the Center For Health and The Global Environment at the University of Washington. Taylor Wilson, USA TODAY, 10 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'coauthor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of coauthor

1827, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for coauthor

Time Traveler

The first known use of coauthor was in 1827

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Dictionary Entries Near coauthor

coat-tree

coauthor

coax

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Last Updated

26 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Coauthor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/coauthor. Accessed 17 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for coauthor

coauthor

noun

English Language Learners Definition of coauthor

: someone who writes a book, article, etc., with another person

coauthor

noun
co·​au·​thor | \ ˈkō-ˈȯ-thər \

Kids Definition of coauthor

: an author who works with another author

More from Merriam-Webster on coauthor

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for coauthor

Nglish: Translation of coauthor for Spanish Speakers

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