citric acid

noun
cit·​ric acid | \ ˈsi-trik- How to pronounce citric acid (audio) \

Definition of citric acid

: a tricarboxylic acid C6H8O7 occurring in cellular metabolism, obtained especially from lemon and lime juices or by fermentation of sugars, and used chiefly as a flavoring

Examples of citric acid in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Add ¼ teaspoon of citric acid or one tablespoon of bottled lemon juice to each jar. Rachel Feltman, Popular Science, "How to can your favorite foods without dying," 13 Oct. 2020 And some that work, including those made with citric acid or hydrogen peroxide, are less toxic than QACs. Scott Mccartney, WSJ, "To Battle Covid, Airlines Bet on Disinfectants That Come With Questions," 30 Sep. 2020 The spray’s formula, which includes hydrogen peroxide, citric acid, and alkylbenzene sulfonic acid, also meets the EPA’s criteria for use against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Christina Butan, PEOPLE.com, "Jessica Alba’s Honest Company Disinfectant Spray Can Kill Coronavirus in 10 Minutes — and It’s on Amazon," 16 Sep. 2020 Never add anything except lemon juice or citric acid and salt to the jar. Cathy Barrow, Washington Post, "How to preserve summer tomatoes so you can enjoy them all year long," 26 Aug. 2020 Add 1/2 teaspoon citric acid or 2 tablespoons lemon juice to each quart jar. Cathy Barrow, Washington Post, "How to preserve summer tomatoes so you can enjoy them all year long," 26 Aug. 2020 Citrus juice, vinegar or citric acid adds bite and makes the jam safer by inhibiting mold, bacteria and microorganism growth, while zest adds a floral note. Leena Trivedi-grenier, SFChronicle.com, "Capture the best of California's peaches in preserves, with a dose of revolution," 19 Aug. 2020 The ingredients include water, sugar, citric acid, magnesium, calcium and sodium. Emiko Jozuka, CNN, "The 'Sweat' you drink: Inside the meteoric rise of Asia's answer to Gatorade," 1 Aug. 2020 Add the citric acid to your bowl and continue to meld the ingredients together until the mixture has the texture of moist sand. Dana Parra, Seventeen, "You Can Make DIY Bath Bombs at Home With Only 5 Ingredients," 18 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'citric acid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of citric acid

1790, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for citric acid

International Scientific Vocabulary

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Time Traveler for citric acid

Time Traveler

The first known use of citric acid was in 1790

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Statistics for citric acid

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Citric acid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/citric%20acid. Accessed 27 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for citric acid

citric acid

noun
How to pronounce citric acid (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of citric acid

: an acid that occurs naturally in the juices of oranges, lemons, limes, etc., and that can also be made from sugar

citric acid

noun
cit·​ric acid | \ ˌsi-trik- How to pronounce citric acid (audio) \

Medical Definition of citric acid

: a sour organic acid C6H8O7 occurring in cellular metabolism, obtained especially from lemon and lime juices or by fermentation of sugars, and used as a flavoring

More from Merriam-Webster on citric acid

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about citric acid

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