chorus

1 of 2

noun

cho·​rus ˈkȯr-əs How to pronounce chorus (audio)
1
a
: a company of singers and dancers in Athenian drama participating in or commenting on the action
also : a similar company in later plays
b
: a character in Elizabethan drama who speaks the prologue (see prologue sense 2) and epilogue (see epilogue sense 2) and comments on the action
c
: an organized company of singers who sing in concert : choir
especially : a body of singers who sing the choral parts of a work (as in opera)
d
: a group of dancers and singers supporting the featured players in a musical comedy or revue
2
a
: a part of a song or hymn recurring at intervals
b
: the part of a drama sung or spoken by the chorus
c
: a composition to be sung by a number of voices in concert
d
: the main part of a popular song
also : a jazz variation on a melodic theme
3
a
: something performed, sung, or uttered simultaneously or unanimously by a number of persons or animals
a chorus of boos
that eternal chorus of: "Are we there yet?" from the back seatSheila More
b
: sounds so uttered
visitors are taken to the woods by car to hear the mournful choruses of howling wolvesBob Gaines

chorus

2 of 2

verb

chorused; chorusing; choruses

transitive verb

: to sing or utter in chorus
"They're here, they're here!" chorused the crowd.
Phrases
in chorus
: in unison
answering in chorus

Examples of chorus in a Sentence

Noun We awoke to a chorus of birdsong. The President's policies have been questioned by a growing chorus of critics. Verb The class chorused “Good morning!”.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
After the indictment, a chorus of critics — some but not all on the right — questioned the legal reasoning, wisdom and winnability of the hush-money case. Michael Rothfeld Emily Woo Zeller Krish Seenivasan David Mason, New York Times, 9 Apr. 2024 On Tuesday, a majority of justices joined that chorus of skepticism. Ali Martin, The Christian Science Monitor, 26 Mar. 2024 In the style of a classic country duet, Cyrus trades verses with Beyoncé before harmonizing with her on the chorus. Shaad D’souza, Pitchfork, 29 Mar. 2024 Peaches, ginger, jasmine and honeysuckle come together in an exuberant chorus that should bring a smile to your palate. Dave McIntyre, Washington Post, 28 Mar. 2024 Lashing out on behalf of a dog can have the effect of diminishing the human on the other side of the screen—dropping a foster dog off at their new home is difficult enough without a Greek chorus of internet strangers harassing you. Caroline Mimbs Nyce, The Atlantic, 28 Mar. 2024 The chorus employs the cooler of Keystone and a fishing trip while the guy adjusts to his newfound freedom. Tom Roland, Billboard, 27 Mar. 2024 Or does the first and second chorus really have to be the same? Rose Eden, SPIN, 26 Mar. 2024 In his account, the papers and the writers are something of a Greek chorus, helping narrate the action but not sharply personified as individual voices. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 25 Mar. 2024
Verb
Most of the monitoring is done during spring evenings, when male toads gather to chorus and breed. Dallas News, 2 May 2022 Two rooms formerly used as locker rooms are now the home to chorus and band. Lily Jackson | Ljackson@al.com, al, 8 Oct. 2019 Outside Carnegie Hall, choir performers from Millennial Choirs and Orchestra chorused as the evening sun dipped low in the sky. Morgan Krakow, Washington Post, 14 July 2019 Twitter chorused: Ivanka and Jared tried to convince me not to make bolognese, according to sources close to the situation. Katy Waldman, Slate Magazine, 22 Aug. 2017 During an eclipse, crickets will chirp and frogs will chorus, thinking night has fallen. Nathan Hurst, Smithsonian, 14 Aug. 2017 In response to the president's moral failure, many commentators chorused: WWE! chicagotribune.com, 15 Aug. 2017

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'chorus.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Verb

Latin, ring dance, chorus, from Greek choros

First Known Use

Noun

1567, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1826, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of chorus was in 1567

Dictionary Entries Near chorus

Cite this Entry

“Chorus.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chorus. Accessed 24 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

chorus

1 of 2 noun
cho·​rus ˈkōr-əs How to pronounce chorus (audio)
ˈkȯr-
1
a
: a group of singers and dancers in Greek drama who take part in or comment on the action
b
: an organized group of singers : choir
c
: a group of dancers and singers (as in a musical comedy)
2
a
: a part of a song or hymn that is repeated every so often : refrain
b
: a song to be sung by a chorus
3
: something uttered by a number of persons or animals all at the same time
a chorus of boos

chorus

2 of 2 verb
: to sing or utter in chorus

More from Merriam-Webster on chorus

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