chicory

noun
chic·​o·​ry | \ ˈchi-k(ə-)rē How to pronounce chicory (audio) \
variants: or less commonly chickory
plural chicories

Definition of chicory

1 : a thick-rooted usually blue-flowered European perennial composite herb (Cichorium intybus) widely grown for its roots and as a salad plant — compare belgian endive, radicchio
2 : the dried ground roasted root of chicory used to flavor or adulterate coffee

Examples of chicory in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Palace also partnered with local roaster French Truck Coffee on its own chicory coffee blend. Ian Mcnulty | Staff Writer, NOLA.com, "How Commander's Palace stays connected from afar, from delivery to chef-led Zoom dinners," 27 Nov. 2020 As well as more than 500 houses, the Sustainable City is home to 11 biodome greenhouses, where the community's management grows up to 1 million pots of leafy produce annually, including chives and chicory. Giovanni Prati, CNN, "For one year, this man is eating only what's grown at Dubai's Sustainable City," 20 Jan. 2021 Combining mild, subtly bitter chicory greens with sweet shrimp is an easy win. Sunset Staff, Sunset Magazine, "21 Recipes You Should Be Cooking This January," 24 Dec. 2020 Good sources of inulin include artichoke, asparagus, and chicory root. USA Today, "How to strengthen your immune system this winter," 17 Dec. 2020 For dessert, the restaurant serves beignets and chicory coffee. Sarah Blaskovich, Dallas News, "Argyle gets spicy new restaurant, ‘where French Quarter meets backwater Cajun’," 5 Nov. 2020 Or the punchiest, purplest chicory Caesar salad to break up the heftier bites. The Healthyish Team, Bon Appétit, "Give Thanks for These 80 Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Dishes," 29 Oct. 2020 This caffeine-free tea is autumn in a cup, with ingredients including cinnamon, ginger, hibiscus, apple, roasted chicory and orange peel. Audrey Eads, Dallas News, "Our 12 favorite fall foods from Trader Joe’s," 5 Oct. 2020 Most commonly found in Italian cuisine, radicchio looks like red cabbage but is part of the chicory family, and is prized for its slightly bitter flavor that mellows when cooked. Judy Walker, NOLA.com, "Surprise vegetables in farmers market boxes can jazz up your meals: Try these easy recipes," 23 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chicory.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of chicory

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for chicory

alteration of Middle English cicoree, from Anglo-French, from Latin cichoreum, from Greek kichoreia

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about chicory

Time Traveler for chicory

Time Traveler

The first known use of chicory was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for chicory

Last Updated

23 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Chicory.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chicory. Accessed 4 Mar. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLA Chicago APA Merriam-Webster

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for chicory

chicory

noun

English Language Learners Definition of chicory

: a European plant that has bitter-tasting leaves that are often used in salads

More from Merriam-Webster on chicory

Nglish: Translation of chicory for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about chicory

Comments on chicory

What made you want to look up chicory? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

February 2021 Words of the Day Quiz

  • squirrel in winter
  • Which is a synonym of perdure?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!