cauldron

noun

caul·​dron ˈkȯl-drən How to pronounce cauldron (audio)
variants or less commonly caldron
1
: a large kettle or boiler
2
: something resembling a boiling cauldron in intensity or degree of agitation
a cauldron of intense emotions

Examples of cauldron in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Reminders of the 2002 Winter Games are nestled throughout the city, from a towering cauldron overlooking the valley to an Olympic emblem stamped on manhole covers downtown. Hannah Schoenbaum, Quartz, 10 Apr. 2024 The slowly bubbling cauldron gradually perfumes the air through the night, spreading through the sleeping house like an open secret. Benjamin Dubow, Longreads, 20 Feb. 2024 These ceramic mugs are available in the shape of the ghost, pumpkin, black cat, mummy, skull, and cauldron, ensuring each shopper will find their preferred Halloween-appropriate shape. Grace Smith, Southern Living, 8 Sep. 2023 Add a cauldron and your kids will have their own pot of gold at the end of the game. Christopher Murray, Fox News, 11 Mar. 2024 Toss all the deficiencies into a cauldron — the inefficiency, the lack of toughness, the floundering finishes and the talent that doesn’t translate to victories — and the result is an undeniable, enduring mediocrity. Jon Wilner, The Mercury News, 7 Mar. 2024 Within this cauldron of hate, entire towns are also seeing their libraries gutted—and in some cases shuttered completely—due to the unrelenting harassment and maligning of librarians, who are invaluable resources to so many in their local communities. Janai S. Nelson and Melanie Willingham-Jaggers, Parents, 24 Jan. 2024 In a video shot by an NBC News team on the ground, several dozen Palestinians — some wrapped in jackets and others barefoot — are seen waiting as workers prepared large cauldrons of soup with pasta shells to hand out. NBC News, 20 Jan. 2024 The camera pans down to the depths of hell to find the artist stewing a cauldron of limbs before returning to heaven to catch a basketball game between Lil Nas X and the devil. Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, 12 Jan. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'cauldron.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English caudron, caldron, from Anglo-French cauderon, diminutive of caldere basin, from Late Latin caldaria, from feminine of Latin caldarius used for hot water, from calidus warm, from calēre to be warm — more at lee

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of cauldron was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near cauldron

Cite this Entry

“Cauldron.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cauldron. Accessed 21 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

cauldron

noun
caul·​dron
variants also caldron
ˈkȯl-drən
1
: a large kettle
2
: something resembling a boiling cauldron in intensity or degree of agitation
a cauldron of intense emotion
Etymology

Middle English caldron, cauldron "cauldron," from earlier cauderon (same meaning), derived from an early French dialect word caudiere "basin," derived from Latin calidus "warm," from calēre "to be hot" — related to calorie, nonchalant

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