cassia

noun

cas·​sia ˈka-shə How to pronounce cassia (audio)
1
or less commonly cassia cinnamon : the dried, aromatic bark of several tropical trees (genus Cinnamomum) that yields a reddish brown to dark brown spice sold as and used similarly to true cinnamon but having a usually stronger, more spicy character
also : the powdered spice produced from cassia bark see indonesian cinnamon
2
: any of a genus (Cassia) of leguminous herbs, shrubs, and trees of warm regions : senna

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Example Sentences

Recent Examples on the Web Tail Martini Spell is an evolution of the classic martini, adding to the core spirit base a sweet and dry vermouth milk punch with cocoa powder and a cassia and bee balm aged cordial. Joanne Shurvell, Forbes, 17 June 2022 The cassia tree blooms in October, with an explosion of small yellow flowers over a canopy of light green. Ishan Kukreti, Quartz, 5 Nov. 2021 Additional notes of carob, chicory, black pepper, Chinese star anise, cloves, and cassia oil round out this flavorful, warm cuppa. Rebecca Angel Baer, Southern Living, 10 Nov. 2019 As punishment he is sentenced for eternity to chop down the cassia trees that grow on the moon. Shannon Stirone, New York Times, 9 July 2019 Shah says oils like cinnamon, clove, lemongrass, cassia, black pepper, and wintergreen can be irritating and recommends always using proper dilution and doing a skin patch test first. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, 7 May 2018 Fortnight lilies and kangaroo paw add height, while dwarf rosemary, feathery cassia, dwarf bottlebrush, sun-loving gaura, red fountain grass and other miscellaneous grasses add texture. Lisa Boone, latimes.com, 13 Mar. 2018 Stockert co-authored a small study of 18 people with type 2 diabetes that showed the cassia species of cinnamon was more effective than diet alone in lowering blood glucose levels. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, 8 Mar. 2018 For Goose Island, the choice was obvious: Proprietor’s, which is meant to evoke bananas Foster with the addition of banana puree, banana essence, roasted almonds and cassia bark. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, 8 Feb. 2018 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cassia.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Old English, from Latin, from Greek kassia, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew qĕṣīʽāh cassia

First Known Use

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of cassia was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near cassia

Cite this Entry

“Cassia.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cassia. Accessed 29 Sep. 2022.

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Medical Definition

cassia

noun

cas·​sia
ˈkash-ə, especially sense 2 ˈkas-ē-ə
1
: the dried, aromatic bark of several tropical trees of the genus Cinnamomum (such as Chinese cinnamon) that yields a reddish brown to dark brown spice sold as and used similarly to true cinnamon but having a usually stronger, more spicy character
also : the powdered spice produced from cassia bark
2
capitalized : a genus of leguminous herbs, shrubs, and trees that are native to warm regions and have pinnate leaves and nearly regular flowers see senna
3

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