carol

noun
car·​ol | \ ˈker-əl How to pronounce carol (audio) , ˈka-rəl \

Definition of carol

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an old round dance with singing
2 : a song of joy or mirth the carol of a bird— Lord Byron
3 : a popular song or ballad of religious joy

carol

verb
caroled or carolled; caroling or carolling

Definition of carol (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to sing especially in a joyful manner
2 : to sing carols specifically : to go about outdoors in a group singing Christmas carols

transitive verb

1 : to praise in or as if in song
2 : to sing especially in a cheerful manner : warble

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Other Words from carol

Verb

caroler or caroller \ ˈker-​ə-​lər How to pronounce carol (audio) , ˈka-​rə-​ \ noun

Synonyms for carol

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of carol in a Sentence

Noun We sang our favorite carols while we decorated the tree. sang carols at the Christmas Eve service Verb Last night, we went caroling with our friends. she caroled with glee when she heard the good news
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Come Out to Sing at Christmas virtual carol concert. Rania Aniftos, Billboard, 16 Dec. 2020 Still, the carol was the most-streamed song of the week, even with Dec. 25 and the next six days after Christmas comprising the chart's streaming tracking week. Gary Trust, Billboard, 4 Jan. 2021 There were movies, too: One of the Left Behind films stars Kirk Cameron, who recently led anti-mask public Christmas carol sings in California to protest Covid-19 restrictions. Matthew Avery Sutton, The New Republic, 14 Jan. 2021 Welsh Christmas carol traveled from the mics to the mixer to the speaker. Richard Read Seattle Bureau Chief, Los Angeles Times, 30 Dec. 2020 The carol spends a ninth total week at No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart and rises 6-2 on Digital Song Sales and 17-13 on Radio Songs. Gary Trust, Billboard, 28 Dec. 2020 At the conclusion of the boat procession a Christmas carol program was staged at the marine park by choirs from San Diego area churches as a benefit for Youth for Christ. San Diego Union-Tribune, 15 Dec. 2020 Meanwhile, the queen was scheduled to appear in public with a clutch of her children and grandchildren for a Christmas carol event Tuesday afternoon with The Salvation Army Band in the quadrangle at Windsor Castle. Maria Puente, USA TODAY, 9 Dec. 2020 Robinson evokes one of the great pop culture-clash duets of all time, when Bing Crosby and David Bowie did a duet on that carol on a Crosby TV special in 1977. Christopher Arnott, courant.com, 17 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Many people carol during the holidays about receiving a partridge in a pear tree from their true love. Los Angeles Times, 6 Dec. 2020 Nuns have gone caroling; gospel choirs have video-harmonized. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 9 Apr. 2020 Guests were offered a variety of holiday activities from caroling and face painting, to Cy-Fair ISD choir performances and hot cocoa courtesy of Land of a Thousand Hills Coffee & Bakery. Melanie Feuk, Houston Chronicle, 5 Dec. 2019 Windsor Castle is open to visitors for tours during the Christmas season as well as a variety of events, from caroling to arts-and-crafts—just like Queen Victoria would have done! Hadley Keller, House Beautiful, 3 Dec. 2019 This December, Kwiecinski will oversee the latest installment of the 12 Days of Grizmas, an extended pre-Christmas celebration in downtown Detroit that includes concerts, yoga classes, caroling, and a roller disco party. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 4 Oct. 2019 The Cardiotonics — which means medicine for the heart — have been caroling at the Brigham for eight years. BostonGlobe.com, 26 Dec. 2019 Over at Snowmass, there will be caroling, a torchlight parade with fireworks and a Roaring 20s New Year’s Eve party in the base village. John Meyer, The Know, 22 Dec. 2019 Children are invited to have their picture taken with Saint Nick and to enjoy Christmas stories, caroling, games and crafts. baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, 6 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'carol.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of carol

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for carol

Noun

Middle English carole, from Anglo-French, modification of Late Latin choraula choral song, from Latin, choral accompanist, from Greek choraulēs, from choros chorus + aulein to play a reed instrument, from aulos, a reed instrument — more at alveolus

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Time Traveler for carol

Time Traveler

The first known use of carol was in the 14th century

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Statistics for carol

Last Updated

23 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Carol.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carol. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for carol

carol

noun

English Language Learners Definition of carol

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a song sung during the Christmas season

carol

verb

English Language Learners Definition of carol (Entry 2 of 2)

: to go from place to place singing Christmas carols

carol

noun
car·​ol | \ ˈker-əl How to pronounce carol (audio) \

Kids Definition of carol

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a usually religious song of joy

carol

verb
caroled or carolled; caroling or carolling

Kids Definition of carol (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to sing in a joyful manner
2 : to sing carols and especially Christmas carols

Other Words from carol

caroler or caroller noun

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