caramel

noun
car·​a·​mel | \ ˈkär-məl How to pronounce caramel (audio) ; ˈker-ə-məl How to pronounce caramel (audio) , ˈka-rə-, -ˌmel \

Definition of caramel

1 : a usually firm to brittle, golden-brown to dark brown substance that has a sweet, nutty, buttery, or bitter flavor, is obtained by heating sugar at high temperature, and used especially as a coloring and flavoring agent Caramel is an ingredient in many candies.
2 : a firm, chewy, usually caramel-flavored candy made with sugar, cream, corn syrup, and butter a bag of caramels

Examples of caramel in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Well balanced, dry on the palate, with fruity and a slight caramel note. Joseph V Micallef, Forbes, 3 May 2022 Pineapple Satay with Coconut Caramel Pineapple holds up to skewering, doesn’t fall apart on the grill, and makes an elegant, surprising dessert—especially when drizzled with a simple-to-make caramel sauce. Magdalena O'neal, Sunset Magazine, 4 Apr. 2022 Alongside the Samoa’s creamy caramel-chocolate-coconut delectability, Illustrator preformed a neat trick of both complementing the cookie with its sweetness, while contrasting with that tobacco wrinkle and the dry finish. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, 23 Mar. 2022 This caramel-hued knitted throw introduces an understated desert color. Better Homes & Gardens, 25 Feb. 2022 But two decades ago, when that wasn’t the case, chocolatier Fran Bigelow introduced her sea salt caramel chocolates at her eponymous shop in Seattle. Jeremy Repanich, Robb Report, 3 Feb. 2022 Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and let the beer reduce until the consistency is like a soft caramel, about 45 minutes. CNN, 8 May 2022 Here’s how to make ginger wine: My only chef-y advice is to have all your ingredients measured and prepped in advance, as the recipe moves quickly after the caramel is ready. Bon Appétit, 3 Mar. 2022 Real Barbecue, a great banana pudding has pure flavors like ripe banana and a rich brown caramel. Abigail Abesamis Demarest, Forbes, 26 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'caramel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of caramel

1702, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for caramel

French, from Spanish caramelo, from Portuguese, icicle, caramel, from Late Latin calamellus small reed — more at shawm

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Time Traveler for caramel

Time Traveler

The first known use of caramel was in 1702

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Dictionary Entries Near caramel

carambole

caramel

caramel brown

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Statistics for caramel

Last Updated

26 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Caramel.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/caramel. Accessed 28 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for caramel

caramel

noun
car·​a·​mel | \ ˈkär-məl How to pronounce caramel (audio) , ˈker-ə-məl \

Kids Definition of caramel

1 : a firm chewy candy
2 : burnt sugar used for coloring and flavoring

caramel

noun
car·​a·​mel | \ ˈkar-ə-məl How to pronounce caramel (audio) , -ˌmel; ˈkär-məl How to pronounce caramel (audio) \

Medical Definition of caramel

: an amorphous brittle brown and somewhat bitter substance obtained by heating sugar and used as a coloring and flavoring agent

More from Merriam-Webster on caramel

Nglish: Translation of caramel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of caramel for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about caramel

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