callus

noun
cal·​lus | \ ˈka-ləs How to pronounce callus (audio) \

Definition of callus

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a thickening of or a hard thickened area on skin or bark
2 : a mass of exudate and connective tissue that forms around a break in a bone and is converted into bone in healing
3 : soft tissue that forms over a wounded or cut plant surface

callus

verb
callused; callusing; calluses

Definition of callus (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to form callus

transitive verb

: to cause callus to form on

Examples of callus in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Neither the size, the narrowness, the fallen arches, emerging bunions, an odd callus or two, Morton’s toes (second toes longer than the firsts) nor — what is certainly a sign of evolutionary progress — the absence of baby toenails put him off. Los Angeles Times, "He was seeking custom-made boots. The journey led to a life deeply touched by love and death and leather," 22 Oct. 2019 In an individual without diabetes and neuropathy, a callus would cause a painful pressure point. David G. Armstrong, STAT, "Diabetic foot ulcers: a silent killer of veterans," 11 Nov. 2019 There are twin calluses at the base of his middle and ring fingers, like a pair of mountains rising from his palm. Kalyn Kahler, SI.com, "Peanut (Not) Brittle: Charles Tillman Is Training to Row Across Lake Michigan," 20 Aug. 2019 As grunge issued a culture-wide call to bond over psychic wounds by comparing calluses, Tool responded with gnarlier body-and-soul horror than many were prepared for. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Why Tool Could Be More Relevant Today Than Ever Before," 21 Aug. 2019 Rautenberg's fingers are barely strong enough to forge a solid guitar chord anymore, the calluses of regular friction long gone. Marc Ramirez, Dallas News, "At 91, Denton-raised big band vocalist is low key about the high life of her youth," 28 July 2019 The weight transfer that causes the buildup can be compared to the way the skin thickens into a callus as a response to pressure or abrasion. Anchorage Daily News, "‘Horns’ are growing on young people’s skulls. Phone use is to blame, research suggests.," 20 June 2019 The weight transfer that causes the buildup can be compared to the way the skin thickens into a callus as a response to pressure or abrasion. BostonGlobe.com, "Horns are growing on young people’s skulls — and phone use is to blame, research suggests," 20 June 2019 The weight transfer that causes the buildup can be compared to the way the skin thickens into a callus as a response to pressure or abrasion. The Washington Post, The Mercury News, "Why are horns growing on young people’s skulls? Phone use is to blame, research suggests.," 20 June 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb If the patches are dry and callused, the fruits should store okay in your basement. Ellen Nibali, baltimoresun.com, "Garden Q&A: Milkweed bugs and butternut squash," 26 Sep. 2019 That seems an obvious goal for a hitter, of course, but with a baseball mind callused by a few long seasons someone like Semien didn’t become stuck in his ways, but more than willing to fix his faults. Shayna Rubin, The Mercury News, "A’s shortstop Marcus Semien belongs in the MVP discussion," 21 Sep. 2019 Just as blisters are badges of honor for distance runners, callused fingers become a rite of passage for any climber. Jen Murphy, WSJ, "Forget Your Washboard Abs, the Hottest Workout Is for Your Fingers," 28 Nov. 2018 Kendall Jenner likes tiny fish chomping at her callused feet. Samantha Sasso, refinery29.com, "The Secret To Cate Blanchett's Glowing Skin Is X-Rated," 14 Mar. 2018 Over the years, the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has left Lanier callused, frostbitten, broken and bruised. Tegan Hanlon, Anchorage Daily News, "The Iditarod gave this musher broken bones and frostbitten toes. At 77, he’s not ready to stop racing.," 5 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'callus.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of callus

Noun

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1824, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for callus

Noun

Latin

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Time Traveler for callus

Time Traveler

The first known use of callus was in 1563

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Statistics for callus

Last Updated

20 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Callus.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/callus. Accessed 18 January 2020.

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More Definitions for callus

callus

noun
How to pronounce callus (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of callus

: a hard and thickened area on the skin and especially on the hands or feet

callus

noun
cal·​lus | \ ˈka-ləs How to pronounce callus (audio) \
plural calluses

Kids Definition of callus

: a hard thickened area on the skin and especially on the hands and feet

callus

noun
cal·​lus | \ ˈkal-əs How to pronounce callus (audio) \

Medical Definition of callus

1 : a thickening of or a hard thickened area on skin
2 : a mass of exudate and connective tissue that forms around a break in a bone and is converted into bone in the healing of the break

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More from Merriam-Webster on callus

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with callus

Spanish Central: Translation of callus

Nglish: Translation of callus for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of callus for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about callus

Comments on callus

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