calendula

noun
ca·​len·​du·​la | \ kə-ˈlen-jə-lə How to pronounce calendula (audio) , -dyu̇-lə \

Definition of calendula

: any of a small genus (Calendula) of yellow-rayed composite herbs of temperate regions

Examples of calendula in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The Bio-Oil Multiuse Skincare Oil claims to improve the appearance of stretch marks, scars, and an uneven skin tone with vitamins A and E and a blend of plant extracts and oils, including rosemary, lavender, calendula, chamomile, and purcellin oils. Jessica Kasparian, USA TODAY, "20 skincare products with thousands of reviews—and why they're worth it," 13 May 2020 Other annuals that self-sow are Verbena bonariensis (tall verbena), nicotiana, calendula and various poppies (including the breadseed or opium poppy, Papaver somniferum). Margaret Roach, New York Times, "Shopping Your Garden," 28 Apr. 2020 Created by eco-friendly company Weleda nearly 100 years ago, this tried-and-true cream made from violas, calendula, and chamomile flowers is incredibly soothing and gentle. Deanne Revel, Condé Nast Traveler, "9 Best Hand Creams to Soothe Dry Skin," 8 Apr. 2020 The calendula, stocks and alyssum are also blooming strong in many flower gardens. Calvin Finch, ExpressNews.com, "What’s blooming now in February in San Antonio-area gardens," 13 Feb. 2020 The major ingredients in Bio-Oil are natural botanical ingredients, like calendula oil, lavender oil, rosemary oil, and chamomile oil, Dr. Hogan says. Sarah Jacoby, SELF, "Can You Use Bio-Oil On Your Face?," 21 Feb. 2020 Bright Green blends verbena, calendula, and ivy to cleanse the skin; the lavender-and-rosemary Pastel Blue promises to combat jet lag. Betsy Blumenthal, Condé Nast Traveler, "The Biggest Wellness Travel Trends: Sound Baths, Tickling Helmets, and More," 14 Feb. 2020 For cool-season color, sow and plant alyssum, bachelor’s button, calendula, coreopsis, delphinium, hollyhock, and poppy. Thad Orr, Sunset Magazine, "Your Essential Winter Gardening To-Do List," 10 Feb. 2020 People who eat flowers mainly choose from a short list that includes nasturtium, borage, viola and calendula. Pam Peirce, SFChronicle.com, "Edible flowers for your garden and dinner table," 7 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'calendula.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of calendula

1651, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for calendula

borrowed from New Latin Calendula, genus name, probably borrowed from Italian calendola "the plant Calendula officinalis," from calenda "first day of the month" (borrowed from Latin Kalendae calends) + -ola, diminutive suffix

Note: Apparently a learned or semi-learned coinage in Italian. Dictionaries attribute the etymon to New Latin, but the earliest instance of it appears to be in Pietro Andrea Mattioli's Di Pedacio Dioscoride Anazarbeo libri cinque della historia & materia medicinale (Venice, 1544), an Italian translation of Dioscorides with Mattioli's commentary. According to Andrea Cesalpino's De plantis libri XVI (Florence, 1583, p. 495), "it is called Calendula in the vernacular, because it blooms monthly" ("Calendula vulgo appellatur; quia singulis mensibus floret…").

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Time Traveler for calendula

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The first known use of calendula was in 1651

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Last Updated

10 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Calendula.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/calendula. Accessed 9 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for calendula

calendula

noun
ca·​len·​du·​la | \ kə-ˈlen-jə-lə How to pronounce calendula (audio) \

Medical Definition of calendula

1 capitalized : a small genus of yellow-rayed composite herbs of temperate regions
2 : any plant of the genus Calendula
3 : the dried florets of plants of the genus Calendula (especially C. officinalis) sometimes used as a mild aromatic and diaphoretic

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