burden of proof

noun phrase

Definition of burden of proof

: the duty of proving a disputed assertion or charge

Examples of burden of proof in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Russell denied the petition, saying Hudson hadn’t met the burden of proof. Alison Knezevich, baltimoresun.com, "Why does it take so long to discipline a judge in Maryland? Recent Glen Burnie homicide brings scrutiny.," 11 July 2019 The law now flips the burden of proof to advocates and victims groups to show that a utility acted unreasonably. Julie Cart, The Mercury News, "California’s new wildfire plan: 5 things to know," 16 July 2019 The burden of proof for accusations that remain unproven is extremely high and especially in light of the special counsel's thoroughness. NBC News, "Full transcript: Mueller testimony before House Judiciary, Intelligence committees," 25 July 2019 Others have raised the burden of proof in forfeiture cases and given more protections to property owners. Radley Balko, Twin Cities, "Radley Balko: Civil asset forfeiture doesn’t discourage drug use or help police solve crimes, study concludes," 16 July 2019 Our system reserves that burden of proof for cases where someone’s liberty is at stake and they may be incarcerated as a result of proceedings. Barbara Mcquade, Time, "These 11 Mueller Report Myths Just Won’t Die. Here’s Why They’re Wrong," 24 June 2019 Given the history of Broward, the partisanship of its officials and their behavior so far, the burden of proof is on Democrats to prove the count is honest. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "A Broward County Senate Steal?," 9 Nov. 2018 For its part Johnson & Johnson argued that the state failed to meet its burden of proof that the company was responsible for the opioid crisis. NBC News, "Oklahoma's multibillion-dollar case against Johnson & Johnson rests in hands of judge," 15 July 2019 In 2018, after conducting a comprehensive review of the evidence, the FDA ruled on which ingredients met that burden of proof. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Why Is Added Fiber in Literally Everything?," 12 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'burden of proof.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of burden of proof

1705, in the meaning defined above

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Last Updated

2 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for burden of proof

The first known use of burden of proof was in 1705

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More Definitions for burden of proof

burden of proof

Legal Definition of burden of proof

: the responsibility of producing sufficient evidence in support of a fact or issue and favorably persuading the trier of fact (as a judge or jury) regarding that fact or issue the burden of proof is sometimes upon the defendant to show his incompetency— W. R. LaFave and A. W. Scott, Jr. — compare standard of proof

Note: The legal concept of the burden of proof encompasses both the burdens of production and persuasion. Burden of proof is often used to refer to one or the other. Burden of proof and burden of persuasion are also sometimes used to refer to the standard of proof.

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Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with burden of proof

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about burden of proof

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