biomolecule

noun
bio·​mol·​e·​cule | \ ˌbī-ō-ˈmä-li-ˌkyül How to pronounce biomolecule (audio) \

Definition of biomolecule

: an organic molecule and especially a macromolecule (such as a protein or nucleic acid) in living organisms

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Other Words from biomolecule

biomolecular \ ˌbī-​ō-​mə-​ˈle-​kyə-​lər How to pronounce biomolecule (audio) \ adjective

Examples of biomolecule in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The discovery that such fossils can harbor bacterial communities different from those in the surrounding stone complicates the search for dinosaur DNA, proteins and other biomolecules. Riley Black, Scientific American, "Possible Dinosaur DNA Has Been Found," 17 Apr. 2020 Carbon can form strong, stable chains and rings of atoms that are ideal for use as information-carrying biomolecules. James Trefil And Michael Summers, Smithsonian Magazine, "If Aliens Exist Elsewhere in the Universe, How Would They Behave?," 31 Dec. 2019 Minerals might have prodded life along by catalyzing reactions that produced biomolecules, for example. Quanta Magazine, "How Life and Luck Changed Earth’s Minerals," 11 Aug. 2015 For Wiemann, the first clues to how biomolecules might persist for hundreds of millions of years came from dinosaur eggs. Gretchen Vogel, Science | AAAS, "Warm-blooded velociraptors? Fossilized proteins unravel dinosaur mysteries," 8 Oct. 2019 In essence, this method allows researchers to freeze a biomolecule in solution then fire electrons at it to study its structure up close. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Herpes Is Kind of Beautiful, On the Molecular Level," 6 Apr. 2018 The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy that can determine high-resolution structures of biomolecules in solution. Steve Mirsky, Scientific American, "Nobel Prize Explainer: Catching Proteins in the Act," 4 Oct. 2017 Plants, like all living things, need nitrogen to build amino acids and other essential biomolecules. Diana Gitig, Ars Technica, "Plants repeatedly got rid of their ability to obtain their own nitrogen," 27 May 2018 While researchers first developed the technique in the 1970s and 1980s, recent advances in computing power have transformed what was once 2D images into detailed 3D models of biomolecules, with increasingly fine resolution. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Herpes Is Kind of Beautiful, On the Molecular Level," 6 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'biomolecule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of biomolecule

1938, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for biomolecule

Time Traveler

The first known use of biomolecule was in 1938

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Cite this Entry

“Biomolecule.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/biomolecule. Accessed 28 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for biomolecule

biomolecule

noun
bio·​mol·​e·​cule | \ -ˈmäl-i-ˌkyü(ə)l How to pronounce biomolecule (audio) \

Medical Definition of biomolecule

: an organic molecule and especially a macromolecule (as a protein or nucleic acid) in living organisms

Other Words from biomolecule

biomolecular \ -​mə-​ˈlek-​yə-​lər How to pronounce biomolecule (audio) \ adjective

Comments on biomolecule

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