biomedicine

noun
bio·​med·​i·​cine | \ ˌbī-ō-ˈme-də-sən How to pronounce biomedicine (audio) , British usually -ˈmed-sən \

Definition of biomedicine

: medicine based on the application of the principles of the natural sciences and especially biology and biochemistry

Examples of biomedicine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Filippa Lentzos, who studies biomedicine and security at King’s College, London, says the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 having an origin connected with legitimate research is being discussed widely in the world of biosecurity. The Economist, "The origin of covid-19 The pieces of the puzzle of covid-19’s origin are coming to light," 2 May 2020 From the popular press to the largest health care conferences, promises of artificial intelligence revolutionizing biomedicine are ubiquitous. Amit Kaushal, Scientific American, "The Talent Gap Holding Back Digital Medicine," 1 Feb. 2020 Shenzhen New Industries Biomedical Engineering Co., an in-vitro diagnosis biomedicine company, plans to raise 1.29 billion yuan ($183 million) on the ChiNext board in Shenzhen. Lucinda Shen, Fortune, "The venture capitalist at the center of the coronavirus fight," 28 Apr. 2020 Mice—easy to handle and breed—have long been the mainstay of biomedicine, and a good mouse model would be a boon for COVID-19 research. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "Mice, hamsters, ferrets, monkeys. Which lab animals can help defeat the new coronavirus?," 13 Apr. 2020 Patrik Jonsson, president of Lilly’s biomedicines division, says his group hadn’t previously thought of baricitinib as an infectious disease treatment. Tom Simonite, Wired, "AI Uncovers a Potential Treatment for Covid-19 Patients," 17 Apr. 2020 Favipiravir was originally developed to treat influenza by Toyama Chemical, which is owned by Fujifilm, the Japanese photography company that now has sizable holdings in biomedicine. Nicolas Niarchos, Time, "A Drug Developed to Fight Ebola Could Hold Hope for Coronavirus Treatment," 1 Apr. 2020 What problems in biomedicine are most likely to benefit from emerging computational capabilities? Amit Kaushal, Scientific American, "The Talent Gap Holding Back Digital Medicine," 1 Feb. 2020 Advances in biomedicine, such as better diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease and cancer, added another 10 years since then. Richard Cooper, STAT, "Precision medicine: course correction urgently needed," 3 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'biomedicine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of biomedicine

1922, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about biomedicine

Time Traveler for biomedicine

Time Traveler

The first known use of biomedicine was in 1922

See more words from the same year

Statistics for biomedicine

Cite this Entry

“Biomedicine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/biomedicine. Accessed 4 Aug. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for biomedicine

biomedicine

noun
bio·​med·​i·​cine | \ -ˈmed-ə-sən, British usually -ˈmed-sən \

Medical Definition of biomedicine

: medicine based on the application of the principles of the natural sciences and especially biology and biochemistry also : a branch of medical science concerned especially with the capacity of human beings to survive and function in abnormally stressful environments and with the protective modification of such environments

Comments on biomedicine

What made you want to look up biomedicine? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

July 2020 Words of the Day Quiz

  • papercraft sunset
  • Which is a synonym of mien?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!