bastion

noun
bas·​tion | \ ˈbas-chən How to pronounce bastion (audio) \

Definition of bastion

1 : a projecting part of a fortification a bastion at each of the fort's five corners
2 : a fortified area or position bombing island bastions
3 : stronghold sense 2 the last bastion of academic standardsAmer. Scientist

Other Words from bastion

bastioned \ ˈbas-​chənd How to pronounce bastion (audio) \ adjective

Did you know?

Bastion is related to bastille (a word now used as a general term for a prison, but probably best known as the name of the Parisian fortress-turned-prison stormed by an angry mob at the start of the French Revolution). It comes from the Italian verb bastire, which means "to build."

Examples of bastion in a Sentence

the rebel army retreated to its bastion in the mountains to regroup
Recent Examples on the Web The rivers and streams above Grand Coulee Dam offer some of the best remaining coldwater habitat for salmon, and could be a bastion for the fish amid climate change. Tony Schick, ProPublica, 4 Aug. 2022 Hussle, who had risen to pop culture prominence in the years leading up to his murder, had shown himself to be a bastion of hope for his community in Crenshaw and was a staunch supporter of the independent grind of which he became known. Kevin L. Clark, Essence, 8 July 2022 Musk is a prolific tweeter -- posting a mix of memes, questions and barbs -- and has vowed to turn Twitter into a bastion for free speech. Michelle F Davis, Bloomberg.com, 21 Apr. 2022 That doesn't make the ball or the organization behind it a bastion of social progress, or even an equitable space. Jill Filipovic, CNN, 8 June 2021 Russian troops were forced to flee the strategic city of Izium -- their main bastion in northeastern Ukraine -- on Saturday after a swift Ukrainian counteroffensive. Nectar Gan, Shawn Deng And Philip Wang, CNN, 12 Sep. 2022 To be fair, Yale has not been a bastion of free speech. Lauren Noble, National Review, 14 Aug. 2022 The institute is a cultural bastion founded in 1854 and houses a library, literary events and the Chess Room, which is the oldest continuously operating chess club in the nation. Chase Difeliciantonio, San Francisco Chronicle, 21 Aug. 2022 As supporters of Beto O’Rourke, the Democratic candidate for Texas governor, emerged from a crowded campaign event in a quaint, conservative bastion north of Dallas, Treva Sanges was there to protest them. New York Times, 19 Aug. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bastion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of bastion

1546, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bastion

borrowed from Middle French, borrowed from Italian bastione, from bastia "small quadrangular fortress" (from an Upper Italian counterpart to Tuscan bastita, from feminine past participle of bastire "to build," probably borrowed from Old Occitan bastir "to weave, build," or its Gallo-Romance ancestor) + -one, augmentative suffix (going back to Latin -ō, -ōn-, suffix of nouns denoting persons with a prominent feature) — more at bastille

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The first known use of bastion was in 1546

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Dictionary Entries Near bastion

basting

bastion

bastite

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Last Updated

30 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Bastion.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bastion. Accessed 1 Oct. 2022.

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More from Merriam-Webster on bastion

Nglish: Translation of bastion for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bastion for Arabic Speakers

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