bank holiday

noun

Definition of bank holiday

1 British : legal holiday
2 : a period when banks in general are closed often by government fiat

Examples of bank holiday in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Stellantis has a new logo and will launch on the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday, due to the Monday U.S. bank holiday, followed by a press conference with Tavares. Colleen Barry, Star Tribune, "Carmaker Stellantis shares jump in Milan, Paris on first day," 18 Jan. 2021 To commemorate the occasion, the UK is adding an extra bank holiday in June, and moving shifting one (the May Spring Bank Holiday) to create a special four-day weekend, from June 2-5. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "Queen Elizabeth Gives Everyone a Four-Day Weekend for Her Platinum Jubilee," 12 Nov. 2020 Death registrations may have been lower in the previous week due to the bank holiday, the government agency said. Eddie Spence, Bloomberg.com, "Virus Deaths in England & Wales Rise for First Time Since April," 22 Sep. 2020 Lovebirds isn’t the only must-see new project out on Netflix for the bank holiday weekend. Ariana Romero, refinery29.com, "You Have 12 New Netflix Treats To Binge Over The Bank Holiday Weekend," 22 May 2020 Roosevelt announced a bank holiday, during which Congress passed the Emergency Banking Act, which empowered the R.F.C. to purchase preferred stock in banks that desperately needed finance. John Cassidy, The New Yorker, "It’s Time to Establish a New Reconstruction Finance Corporation," 24 Mar. 2020 That could include a possible bank holiday, in which financial institutions are closed. New York Times, "Stocks and Bond Yields Sink, Capping a Week of Wild Trading," 6 Mar. 2020 The Housekeeping Assistant will receive 33 holidays, including includes bank holidays. Joseph Neese, House Beautiful, "Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Have an Opening for a New Housekeeper at Windsor Castle," 4 Jan. 2020 The Great Depression really began when the banks started failing in 1930, and then there were more bank failures in 1931 and 1932, leading to a bank holiday when FDR became president in ’33. Olivia B. Waxman, Time, "What Caused the Stock Market Crash of 1929—And What We Still Get Wrong About It," 24 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bank holiday.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bank holiday

1778, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for bank holiday

Time Traveler

The first known use of bank holiday was in 1778

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Statistics for bank holiday

Last Updated

3 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Bank holiday.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bank%20holiday. Accessed 27 Feb. 2021.

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