aureus

noun

au·​re·​us ˈȯr-ē-əs How to pronounce aureus (audio)
plural aurei
ˈȯr-ē-ˌī
: a gold coin of ancient Rome varying in weight from ¹/₃₀ to ¹/₇₀ libra

Examples of aureus in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web In lab experiments, the honey protected against the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which causes a wide range of diseases in humans, but did not protect against other bacteria. Will Sullivan, Smithsonian Magazine, 28 July 2023 Laboratory tests found that the ant honey could resist Staphylococcus aureus bacteria but no other types of microbes. Elizabeth Gamillo, Discover Magazine, 31 July 2023 About 40% of those S. aureus infections were the difficult-to-treat kind: methicillin-resistant S. aureus, also known as MRSA. Isabella Cueto, STAT, 6 Feb. 2023 In the study, researchers examined 22 cultivars (types) of black walnut and found that some exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Brittany Lubeck, Rd, Verywell Health, 16 Mar. 2023 In addition to bacteria from sweat, clothes worn in gyms or sports settings can come into contact with bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in infections common in community and hospital settings. Kristen Rogers, CNN, 2 Feb. 2023 While the results are promising, Otto said the study is very specific to the Bacillus-S. aureus interaction. Mira Miller, Verywell Health, 15 Mar. 2023 MecC…and a related gene MecA…encode versions of the enzymes that the antibiotics don’t latch onto as well. Larsen: Staph aureus bacteria that carry these genes are therefore resistant to most beta lactam antibiotics. Karen Hopkin, Scientific American, 8 June 2022 About Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are commonly found on the skin and in the noses of healthy people. Cnn Editorial Research, CNN, 8 June 2021 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'aureus.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Latin, literally, golden, from aurum gold; akin to Old Prussian ausis gold

First Known Use

1609, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of aureus was in 1609

Dictionary Entries Near aureus

Cite this Entry

“Aureus.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aureus. Accessed 22 Feb. 2024.

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