ascendance

noun
as·cen·dance | \ ə-ˈsen-dən(t)s \
variants: or less commonly ascendence

Definition of ascendance 

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Examples of ascendance in a Sentence

studied the ascendance of modernism in 20th-century art and design

Recent Examples on the Web

Pompeo’s ascendance may reduce public disagreements between the White House and Foggy Bottom, but the timing and manner of Tillerson’s firing only confirm that Trump still controls policy from the White House. Elizabeth N. Saunders, Washington Post, "Could Mike Pompeo actually succeed as secretary of state?," 13 Mar. 2018 At the root of this analysis, of course, is the assumption that liberalism has been on a steady, triumphant march — that a progressive ascendance sparks a conservative reaction. Cameron Tung, New York Times, "Online or in Politics, ‘Backlash’ Is as Predictable as Weather," 24 Apr. 2018 Only the arrogant ascendance of psychiatry in postwar America—warmly remembered by Neubauer's former research assistant, Natasha Josefowitz—can account for the researchers' duplicity. J.r. Jones, Chicago Reader, "Triplets ripped from family in a Nazi-like experiment, probed in Three Identical Strangers," 5 July 2018 His political ascendance is the product of a savvy bet that there would be no meaningful consequences for abusing the hallowed norms of Washington. Jay Willis, GQ, "Public Shaming Is Powerful," 25 June 2018 The arrival of Doncic and the continued ascendance of Smith Jr. should ease the defensive pressure on Barnes. Peter Dawson, star-telegram, "Projected starting 5 for the Mavs next season has to include Luka Doncic, right?," 25 June 2018 This was in 2007, before Trump’s walls or the fervent pitch of nationalist rhetoric reached its ascendance. Malaika Jabali, Glamour, "Why Anthony Bourdain’s Life Is a Lesson for White Men of Privilege on How to Be an Ally," 8 June 2018 This important trilogy, then, through its eloquent polyphony of voices and opinions, arrives at an idea of feminist art in opposition to the confessional mode that has long been in ascendance. Sam Sacks, WSJ, "Fiction: The Monologues of Friends and Strangers," 1 June 2018 But with a new P.R. mess on its hands, Snap’s re-ascendance remains an uphill battle. Maya Kosoff, The Hive, "“People Are Going to Make Mistakes”: Evan Spiegel Defends Snap Against Charges of Sexism," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ascendance.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ascendance

1715, in the meaning defined above

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Dictionary Entries near ascendance

Ascaroidea

ASCE

ascend

ascendance

ascendancy

ascendant

ascender

Statistics for ascendance

Last Updated

3 Sep 2018

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The first known use of ascendance was in 1715

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More Definitions for ascendance

ascendance

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ascendance

: the act of rising or moving up : the act of ascending

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