arrest

verb
ar·​rest | \ ə-ˈrest How to pronounce arrest (audio) \
arrested; arresting; arrests

Definition of arrest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : seize, capture specifically : to take or keep in custody by authority of law Police arrested the suspect.
2a : to bring to a stop Sickness arrested his activities.
b : check, slow Its growth was arrested.
c : to make inactive an arrested tumor
3 : to catch suddenly and engagingly arrest attention

arrest

noun

Definition of arrest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the taking or detaining in custody by authority of law The investigation led to his arrest.
2a : the act of stopping
b : the condition of being stopped or inactive — compare cardiac arrest
under arrest
: in legal custody The suspect was placed under arrest.

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Other Words from arrest

Verb

arrester or less commonly arrestor \ ə-​ˈre-​stər How to pronounce arrestor (audio) \ noun
arrestment \ ə-​ˈres(t)-​mənt How to pronounce arrestment (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for arrest

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of arrest in a Sentence

Verb The police arrested him on drug charges. The police officer said, “I'm arresting you in the name of the law.” The drugs can't arrest the disease's progress, but they can slow it down considerably. Noun The police are investigating the case but they have not yet made any arrests. She was charged with resisting arrest. The information has led to the arrest of three suspects.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As the officers attempted to arrest a suspect at the scene, the suspect stabbed a Park Station sergeant in the face and injured two other officers before being taken into custody, police said. Brett Simpson, SFChronicle.com, "Police: Suspect stabbed San Francisco officer in face during arrest in Haight-Ashbury," 30 July 2020 Unmarked vehicles might be used in undercover operations, and they might be used to execute a search warrant or arrest warrant, so that there’s an element of surprise. Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker, "The Constitutional Case Against Trump’s Use of the Department of Homeland Security," 30 July 2020 Last week, police sought to arrest Dubey and others accused of being in his criminal gang. Biswajeet Banerjee, USA TODAY, "Vikas Dubey, top crime suspect in deaths of 8 Indian police officers, killed in shootout," 11 July 2020 On Friday, officers were investigating a shooting of multiple people at a July 5 block party and trying to arrest a man with a separate felony drug warrant, Chief James Craig said. Darcie Moran, Detroit Free Press, "8 arrests made during Friday protests after Detroit police fatally shoot man," 11 July 2020 The state has said repeatedly that the mask order, which will be enforced by the local health departments, isn’t designed to arrest people. Mary Kilpatrick, cleveland, "How public health laws like the mask mandate work -- and how they could help businesses," 10 July 2020 Instead of searching for answers and cloaking Mr. Jackson in the presumption of innocence which the law requires, law enforcement chose to arrest Mr. Jackson without gathering all of the evidence,‘' Revill said. Carol Robinson | Crobinson@al.com, al, "Teens charged in Royta Giles’ death were defending themselves, lawyers say," 9 July 2020 Seton Hall's Lewis said the Chinese government might quickly use it to arrest a few big names, scaring smaller players into submission, or quietly keep it in reserve. Ben Westcott, CNN, "Hong Kong was once a home for critics of Beijing. Now they might not even be safe at the airport," 3 July 2020 After the Polk business called police at about 7 a.m., there was a brief foot chase before deputies were able to arrest the man. Cathy Kozlowicz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A Milwaukee man fled from police and led them on a pursuit in Washington County, police say," 1 July 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Since the arrest of Maxwell, conspiracy theories about an elite pedophile ring have spread across the internet, accusing celebrities like Chrissy Teigen, Ellen DeGeneres and Oprah Winfrey of involvement. Adrienne Dunn, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Several celebrities are falsely linked to Jeffrey Epstein's flight logs," 31 July 2020 The student’s victims, by contrast, were presumably also from elite backgrounds like him, and thus able to win more attention for their accusations and bring about his swift arrest and prosecution, said activists. Washington Post, "Egypt’s women are rising up against sexual violence. Others are still being jailed for TikToks.," 31 July 2020 Yuriy Kachankov, 30, was also was slapped with the above charges, as well as a charge for resisting arrest. Breanna Edwards, Essence, "7 Men Arrested For Yelling Racial Slurs, Making Nazi Salute At Black Family," 6 July 2020 Now that does not in any kind of way excuse Mr. Brooks for resisting arrest. Author: Russ Bynum And Sean Murphy, Anchorage Daily News, "Experts hail swift moves in wake of Atlanta police shooting," 15 June 2020 Now that does not in any kind of way excuse Mr. Brooks for resisting arrest. Russ Bynum, BostonGlobe.com, "Atlanta shooting, statues new focal points for protests," 14 June 2020 Now that does not in any kind of way excuse Mr. Brooks for resisting arrest. Russ Bynum And Sean Murphy, The Christian Science Monitor, "Why Atlanta moved quickly after weekend police shooting," 14 June 2020 He was subsequently charged with resisting arrest, assault on a police officer and criminal damaging. cleveland, "Sex film leads to domestic dispute: Richmond Heights Police Blotter," 11 June 2020 Throughout the interview, Gray repeatedly claimed that his client's body camera footage, which has not been released publicly, shows a different story and would prove that Floyd tried resisting arrest. Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "Attorney for ex-officer: Bystanders should have intervened to save George Floyd," 9 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'arrest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of arrest

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

History and Etymology for arrest

Verb and Noun

Middle English aresten, from Anglo-French arester to stop, arrest, from Vulgar Latin *arrestare, from Latin ad- + restare to remain — more at rest

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Time Traveler for arrest

Time Traveler

The first known use of arrest was in the 14th century

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Statistics for arrest

Last Updated

2 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Arrest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/arrest. Accessed 6 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for arrest

arrest

verb
How to pronounce arrest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of arrest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to use the power of the law to take and keep (someone, such as a criminal)
formal : to stop the progress or movement of (something)
formal : to attract and hold the attention of (someone or something)

arrest

noun

English Language Learners Definition of arrest (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of legally taking and keeping someone (such as a criminal) : the act of arresting someone
medical : an occurrence in which a part of the body suddenly stops working

arrest

verb
ar·​rest | \ ə-ˈrest How to pronounce arrest (audio) \
arrested; arresting

Kids Definition of arrest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to take or keep control over (someone) by authority of law She was arrested on suspicion of robbery.
2 : to stop the progress or movement of : check arrest a disease
3 : to attract and hold the attention of But I was suddenly arrested by a sight that only Grandma and I saw.— Richard Peck, A Year Down Yonder

arrest

noun

Kids Definition of arrest (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of taking or holding a person by authority of law
ar·​rest | \ ə-ˈrest How to pronounce arrest (audio) \

Medical Definition of arrest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bring to a standstill or state of inactivity arrested tuberculosis arrested labor

intransitive verb

: to undergo cardiac arrest the…patient has arrested while being transported to surgery— Wayne Fields

Other Words from arrest

arrestment noun

arrest

noun

Medical Definition of arrest (Entry 2 of 2)

: the condition of being stopped developmental arrest — see cardiac arrest — compare cure entry 1 sense 1, remission

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arrest

noun
ar·​rest | \ ə-ˈrest \

Legal Definition of arrest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the restraining and seizure of a person whether or not by physical force by someone acting under authority (as a police officer) in connection with a crime in such a manner that it is reasonable under the circumstances for the person to believe that he or she is not free to leave — see also miranda warnings, probable cause at cause sense 2, warrant — compare stop
citizen's arrest
: an arrest made not by a law officer but by any citizen who derives the authority to arrest from the fact of being a citizen

Note: Under common law, a citizen may make an arrest for any felony actually committed, or for a breach of the peace committed in his or her presence.

civil arrest
: the arrest and detention of a defendant in a civil suit until he or she posts bail or pays the judgment — see also capias ad respondendum

Note: Civil arrest is restricted or prohibited in most states.

custodial arrest
: an arrest of a person accompanied by or followed by taking the person into custody
false arrest
: an arrest made without legal authority

called also unlawful arrest

Note: If a person is taken into custody, no matter how briefly, a false arrest is also false imprisonment.

pretext arrest \ ˈprē-​ˌtekst-​ \
: the arrest of a person for a minor crime (as a traffic violation) for the real purpose of getting an opportunity to investigate (as through a search) the person's possible involvement in a more serious crime for which there are no lawful grounds to make an arrest

called also pretextual arrest

unlawful arrest
: false arrest in this entry
under arrest
: in the condition of being restrained under legal authority

Legal Definition of arrest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to place under arrest

Other Words from arrest

arrester also arrestor noun

History and Etymology for arrest

Noun

Middle French arest, from arester to stop, seize, arrest, ultimately from Latin ad to, at + restare to stay

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