armature

noun
ar·ma·ture | \ˈär-mə-ˌchu̇r, -chər, -ˌtyu̇r, -ˌtu̇r\

Definition of armature 

1 : an organ or structure (such as teeth or thorns) for offense or defense

2a : a piece of soft iron or steel that connects the poles of a magnet or of adjacent magnets

b : a usually rotating part of an electric machine (such as a generator or motor) which consists essentially of coils of wire around a metal core and in which electric current is induced or in which the input current interacts with a magnetic field to produce torque

c : the movable part of an electromagnetic device (such as a loudspeaker)

d : a framework used by a sculptor to support a figure being modeled in a plastic material

e : framework sense 1a events that serve as the armature of the book

Examples of armature in a Sentence

the rigid armature of a highly stratified society

Recent Examples on the Web

The art lies not only in the fresh efficacy of idea and utterance, but in the story’s armature, its determining designs. William Giraldi, The Seattle Times, "Glen David Gold’s new memoir is ‘a soiree of heart-wreck wised up by humor’," 9 July 2018 An armature can be made of metal, wood, or anything that will support the weight of an appendage. Lisa Deaderick, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Carving out social and political commentary in bronze," 27 May 2018 If the armature is weak, the piece can suddenly collapse after maybe a week or a month of sculpting. Lisa Deaderick, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Carving out social and political commentary in bronze," 27 May 2018 The feet and the armature holding the feet in place will come off. Steve Johnson And Phil Geib, chicagotribune.com, "The dismantling of Sue the T. rex at the Field Museum," 3 Feb. 2018 The windings are magnetized by the charge and push against the stationary ring of magnets that surround it, forcing the armature assembly to spin. Doug Mahoney, Popular Mechanics, "What's So Great About Brushless Motor Power Tools?," 12 Jan. 2018 Just visible under a much-unbuttoned cornflower-blue blouse is a lace brassiere that, in context, reads more like medieval armature than an erotic statement. Phoebe Eaton, Harper's BAZAAR, "L'Wren Scott Rocks," 23 Mar. 2011 Austen’s novels provide a solid armature on which to hang a plot from another genre or time period. Michael Berry, San Francisco Chronicle, "Roundup of new science fiction and fantasy books, March 18," 14 Mar. 2018 The magnets and brushes are stationary, while the armature and commutator rotate together on the motor shaft within the magnets. Doug Mahoney, Popular Mechanics, "What's So Great About Brushless Motor Power Tools?," 12 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'armature.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of armature

1653, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for armature

Middle English, armor, from Latin armatura armor, equipment, from armatus

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Time Traveler for armature

The first known use of armature was in 1653

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More Definitions for armature

armature

noun

English Language Learners Definition of armature

: the part of an electric motor or generator that produces an electric current when it turns in a magnetic field

: a frame used by a sculptor to support a figure that is being modeled

armature

noun
ar·ma·ture | \ˈär-mə-chər \

Kids Definition of armature

: the part of an electric motor or generator that turns in a magnetic field

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