amygdala

noun
amyg·​da·​la | \ ə-ˈmig-də-lə \
plural amygdalae\ ə-​ˈmig-​də-​ˌlē , -​ˌlī \

Definition of amygdala

: the one of the four basal ganglia in each cerebral hemisphere that is part of the limbic system and consists of an almond-shaped mass of gray matter in the anterior extremity of the temporal lobe

called also amygdaloid nucleus

Examples of amygdala in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Connections between the amygdala and hippocampus were also weak in the infected macaques, which suggests signals sent between those two areas—ones that would help the infants recognize and respond to stressful situations—would be slow or spotty. Dina Fine Maron, Scientific American, "Zika Exposure Even after Birth May Lead to Brain Damage," 4 Apr. 2018 Not completely away, but in a synaptic cabinet beneath my amygdala. Abby Ellin, Marie Claire, "I Almost Married a Con Man," 8 Jan. 2019 But the amygdala isn’t the only candidate for controlling fear. Rowan Hooper, WSJ, "The Biology of Bravery—and Fear," 19 Oct. 2018 One study suggests that parents help children to induce a more mature form of amygdala-prefrontal connectivity that encourages effective regulation. Dylan Gee, Vox, "I study kids who were separated from their parents. The trauma could change their brains forever.," 20 June 2018 Indeed, taking the amygdala entirely out of the picture can virtually eliminate fear. Rowan Hooper, WSJ, "The Biology of Bravery—and Fear," 19 Oct. 2018 People who are prone to procrastination have a larger amygdala, which deals with emotions and have a harder time turning emotional information into action. Fox News, "Kavanaugh grilled on cases during confirmation hearing," 6 Sep. 2018 Trust your instincts, your natural, innate, amygdala and reptilian-brained instincts, thousands of years old, that respond without thinking to the stress, threat, or danger intrinsically felt by all animals. Polo Tate, Marie Claire, "Sexual Assault in the Military: One Woman's True Story," 8 Aug. 2018 The amygdala, a subcortical brain structure that responds to threat, can become hijacked: Children who experienced parental deprivation show amygdala hyperactivity, meaning the brain is more likely to signal danger even when there is none. Dylan Gee, Vox, "I study kids who were separated from their parents. The trauma could change their brains forever.," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'amygdala.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of amygdala

1845, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for amygdala

New Latin, from Latin, almond, from Greek amygdalē

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Last Updated

15 Feb 2019

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Time Traveler for amygdala

The first known use of amygdala was in 1845

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More Definitions for amygdala

amygdala

noun
amyg·​da·​la | \ ə-ˈmig-də-lə \
plural amygdalae\ -​ˌlē , -​ˌlī \

Medical Definition of amygdala

: the one of the four basal ganglia in each cerebral hemisphere that is part of the limbic system and consists of an almond-shaped mass of gray matter in the roof of the lateral ventricle

called also amygdaloid body, amygdaloid nucleus

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More from Merriam-Webster on amygdala

Nglish: Translation of amygdala for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of amygdala for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about amygdala

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