amicus

noun
ami·​cus | \ ə-ˈmē-kəs How to pronounce amicus (audio) , -ˈmī- How to pronounce amicus (audio) \
plural amici\ ə-​ˈmē-​ˌkē How to pronounce amici (audio) , -​ˈmī-​ˌsī \

Definition of amicus

Examples of amicus in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Matorin’s argument was echoed in amicus briefs filed by other landlords and their trade groups around the state. Tim Logan, BostonGlobe.com, "As Mass. eviction ban heads to court, it’s attracting attention nationwide," 29 July 2020 The university has signed an amicus brief in support of Harvard and MIT’s lawsuit and a letter from the American Council of Education that will be submitted next week to congressional leaders. Alia Malik, ExpressNews.com, "UT San Antonio, going mostly virtual, will work to preserve visas of international students with in-person classes," 10 July 2020 Several other universities, including Penn State, Duke, the University of Michigan, and Stanford, have also filed what are known as amicus briefs in support of the Harvard and MIT lawsuit. Shraddha Chakradhar, STAT, "‘I feel like I am not welcome’: Medical, doctoral students from abroad grapple with uncertainty from new ICE rules," 10 July 2020 The amicus brief filed this week backs the Virginia attorney general’s suit—citing not just human rights, but a business case. Annalisa Merelli, Quartz at Work, "Large businesses have come out in support of the ERA—including some with sexist histories," 3 July 2020 Emma’s story focuses on the amicus brief—signed by 93 organizations—in support of the ERA. Fortune, "It’s time to focus on the state of healthcare for Black women," 1 July 2020 Along with the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, these schools filed an amicus brief in August, warning that such revisions would threaten their ability to exercise their faith freely. Nicholas Rowan, Washington Examiner, "Religious colleges fear Supreme Court transgender decision will endanger single-sex dorms and women's sports," 18 June 2020 Last summer, more than 200 major businesses signed an amicus brief arguing that LGBTQ employees should enjoy federal protections from job discrimination. Maria Aspan, Fortune, "Fortune 500 CEOs praise landmark LGBTQ anti-discrimination ruling," 16 June 2020 Jefferson County District Attorney Danny Carr on Friday filed an amicus brief in county court suggesting that an Alabama death row inmate convicted of killing a Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy in 1998 be granted a new trial. Howard Koplowitz | Hkoplowitz@al.com, al, "Jeffco DA files amicus brief supporting new trial for Alabama death row inmate Toforest Johnson," 12 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'amicus.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of amicus

1943, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about amicus

Time Traveler for amicus

Time Traveler

The first known use of amicus was in 1943

See more words from the same year

Statistics for amicus

Last Updated

4 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Amicus.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/amicus. Accessed 8 Aug. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for amicus

amicus

noun
ami·​cus | \ ə-ˈmē-kəs, -ˈmī- How to pronounce amicus (audio) \
plural amici\ -​ˈmē-​ˌkē, -​ˈmī-​ˌsī How to pronounce amici (audio) \

Legal Definition of amicus

Comments on amicus

What made you want to look up amicus? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Original Meanings Quiz

  • rembrandt painting a young scholar and his tutor
  • Which of the following is the earliest known sense of the word awe?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Bee Cubed

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!