almshouse

noun
alms·​house | \ ˈä(l)mz-ˌhau̇s How to pronounce almshouse (audio) \

Definition of almshouse

1 British : a privately financed home for the poor

Examples of almshouse in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Among the biggest beggars at the federal almshouse is McConnell’s home state, Kentucky, which ranked eighth. Los Angeles Times, "Column: Despite rising pandemic costs, Republicans are already talking about cutting off aid," 23 Apr. 2020 Gerhard returned to Philadelphia in 1833 to serve as resident physician at the sick wards of the city’s almshouse, then known as the Philadelphia Hospital. Timothy Kent Holliday, Smithsonian Magazine, "What an 1836 Typhus Outbreak Taught the Medical World About Epidemics," 21 Apr. 2020 Part nursing home, part hospital and part old-fashioned almshouse, Laguna Honda serves those with nowhere else to turn. Jason Fagone, SFChronicle.com, "Coronavirus outbreak at SF’s largest nursing home: Early missteps, delayed response at Laguna Honda," 6 Apr. 2020 Day 3: Visit the Hospices de Beaune, the stunning 15th-century almshouse that’s a museum for much of the year but transforms into the home base of the grandest wine auction in the world on the third Sunday of every November. Hugh Garvey, Condé Nast Traveler, "Road Trip: 3 Days in Burgundy, France," 23 Mar. 2018 The 148-acre isle—on the East River between Manhattan and Queens—has been home to a prison, a smallpox hospital, an asylum, an almshouse and a 1970s experiment in affordable middle-class housing. WSJ, "Campus of the Future," 16 Sep. 2017 Herald Harbor is still called Herald Harbor, but in the 1960s, Woodland Beach dubbed itself London Towne, the name of an earlier settlement on the peninsula and of a Colonial-era almshouse there. John Kelly, Washington Post, "Answer Man remembers when D.C. newspapers had their own summer resorts," 1 July 2017 The almshouse was built in 1857 on a 256-acre farm, now occupied by sites such as the Equestrian Center and the Harford County Parks & Recreation Department headquarters. David Anderson, The Aegis, "Cemetery for Harford County's poor given new life for Eagle Scout project," 16 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'almshouse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of almshouse

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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The first known use of almshouse was in the 14th century

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Cite this Entry

“Almshouse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/almshouse. Accessed 4 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for almshouse

almshouse

noun
How to pronounce almshouse (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of almshouse

in the past : a building in which poor people were allowed to live for free

More from Merriam-Webster on almshouse

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with almshouse

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about almshouse

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