Xray

1 of 3

communications code word

used as a code word for the letter x

x-ray

2 of 3

verb

x-rayed; x-raying; x-rays
often capitalized

transitive verb

: to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays

X-ray

3 of 3

noun

1
: any of the electromagnetic radiations that have an extremely short wavelength of less than 100 angstroms and have the properties of penetrating various thicknesses of all solids, of producing secondary radiations by impinging on material bodies, and of acting on photographic films and plates as light does
2
: a photograph obtained by use of X-rays
X-ray adjective

Examples of Xray in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
An Italian team had hoped to make history by using high-tech tools — electron microscopy, spectroscopy and micro x-rays — to reveal the cellular structure of one of the world’s oldest reptiles. Lisa M. Krieger, The Mercury News, 20 Feb. 2024 The Medical Exams Since 1987, doctors with IU Health, a healthcare system affiliated with Indiana University School of Medicine, perform x-rays, MRIs, echocardiograms, EKGs, blood and drug tests, and other exams at each year’s Combine. Chris Deubert, Forbes, 20 Feb. 2024 In 2020, the Saint Louis Zoo in Missouri posted a video on Facebook in which Dr. Chris Hanley, assistant director of animal health, said one of the zoo's alligators had what appeared to be, based on x-rays, a coin inside her stomach. Brendan Le, Peoplemag, 19 Feb. 2024 The archaeologists took x-rays of the skeletons in the tombs and compared them to detailed descriptions about the Macedonian royals, including height, weight, injuries and physical anomalies, according to Live Science. Brie Stimson, Fox News, 17 Feb. 2024 After the bucket was removed, the coyote was assessed further, with fluids administered and x-rays taken. Esme Mazzeo, Peoplemag, 26 Jan. 2024 Two days later, investigators talked with the man in the hospital and received x-rays of his injuries. Olivia Lloyd, Charlotte Observer, 26 Jan. 2024 Called the Rosalind Franklin rover, in honor of the x-ray crystallographer who helped uncover the structure of DNA, this mission will drill two meters below the Martian surface, far deeper than any before. Christopher Wanjek, Scientific American, 14 Dec. 2023 Authorities subsequently performed a Z-Portal x-ray scan on the vehicle and began to notice several anomalies with the vehicle. Jon Haworth, ABC News, 21 Nov. 2023
Noun
Chmerkovskiy posted images of his X-rays, along with another of himself in a neck brace and hooked up to a drip. Becca Longmire, Peoplemag, 22 Feb. 2024 The first is a product of the medical record—the sum of blood tests, X-rays, and urine samples. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, 18 Feb. 2024 At the time, people feared that the health impact of radiation exposure from X-rays could pass down to their children. Stephanie Brown, Verywell Health, 12 Feb. 2024 When lasers hit the outside of this capsule, their energy is converted into X-rays that then blast the fuel pellet, which consists of a diamond outer shell coated on the inside with deuterium and tritium fuel. IEEE Spectrum, 6 Feb. 2024 Searches for TDEs that gave off optical emissions (meaning visible light) and X-rays led to an increase in TDE discoveries in the 2010s. Elizabeth Rayne, Ars Technica, 6 Feb. 2024 Premier delivers high-quality and timely reads enabling clinicians to more quickly see and deliver results for all services, including general X-rays, NIOSH B-reads, TB screenings, pre-employment screenings, cardiac screenings, and musculoskeletal and general ultrasound interpretations. Sacramento Bee, 6 Feb. 2024 Why is a Baby X-Ray Tube Needed? When done only when needed and using the lowest amount of radiation possible, X-rays are a vital tool doctors use to diagnose and treat many types of illnesses and injuries. Hollee Actman Becker, Parents, 6 Feb. 2024 The trauma team — technicians, nurses, doctors — took X-rays, hooked up intravenous lines, checked Tashay’s eyes, blood pressure, breathing. Eric Adler, Kansas City Star, 4 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'Xray.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Communications Code Word

1943, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1899, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1896, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of Xray was in 1896

Dictionary Entries Near Xray

x-ray

Xray

X-ray

Cite this Entry

“Xray.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Xray. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

x-ray

1 of 2 verb
ˈeks-ˌrā
often capitalized X
: to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays

X-ray

2 of 2 noun
ˈeks-ˌrā
1
: an electromagnetic radiation of an extremely short wavelength that is able to penetrate various thicknesses of solids and to act on photographic film as light does
2
: a photograph taken by the use of X-rays
X-ray adjective
Etymology

Noun

from German X-Strahl "X-ray," from the use of x to represent an unknown value

Word Origin
In 1895, a German scientist, Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, was experimenting with an electric current passing through a vacuum in a glass tube. He found that a piece of material that glows only when electricity passes through it began to glow even though it was not inside the tube. Röntgen tried to shield the material from the tube. However, he found that the material glowed even when it was shielded by paper or wood. Only a shield of metal stopped the glowing. He guessed that an unknown invisible ray created inside the glass tube was causing this to happen. Since he knew nothing about this mysterious ray, Röntgen called it X-Strahl in German, which translates as X-ray in English. He was using the letter x, which had long been used in mathematics for an unknown value.

Medical Definition

x-ray

1 of 2 transitive verb
often capitalized X
: to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays

X-ray

2 of 2 noun
1
: any of the electromagnetic radiations of the same nature as visible radiation but of an extremely short wavelength less than 100 angstroms that is produced by bombarding a metallic target with fast electrons in vacuum or by transition of atoms to lower energy states and that has the properties of ionizing a gas upon passage through it, of penetrating various thicknesses of all solids, of producing secondary radiations by impinging on material bodies, of acting on photographic films and plates as light does, and of causing fluorescent screens to emit light

called also roentgen ray

2
: a photograph obtained by use of X-rays
a chest X-ray
X-ray adjective
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