Seleucid

noun

Se·​leu·​cid sə-ˈlü-səd How to pronounce Seleucid (audio)
səl-ˈyü-
: a member of a Greek dynasty ruling Syria and at various times other Asian territories from 312 b.c. to 64 b.c.
Seleucid adjective

Examples of Seleucid in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The Seleucid Empire, founded by one of Alexander’s generals, took control of the region in the late fourth century and ruled until its collapse 250 years later, continuing to imprint Greek culture on the ever-feuding tribes. Joshua Hammer, Smithsonian Magazine, 15 May 2024 After that came the Seleucid Greeks, who ran things briefly, only to be kicked aside by the Romans, who were running everything in those days. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 21 Aug. 2023 On his West Bank settlement, Givat Hirel, there is an award-winning winery, a busy nursery, fancy homes with dramatic hilltop views and lush green gorges below – one of which is said to be one of the battle sites of the Maccabean Revolt, an ancient Jewish uprising against Greece's Seleucid Empire. Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY, 2 May 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'Seleucid.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

New Latin seleucides, from Seleucus I

First Known Use

1851, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of Seleucid was in 1851

Dictionary Entries Near Seleucid

Cite this Entry

“Seleucid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Seleucid. Accessed 18 Jul. 2024.

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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