émigré

noun

émi·​gré ˈe-mi-ˌgrā How to pronounce émigré (audio)
ˌe-mi-ˈgrā
variants or less commonly emigré
often attributive
: emigrant
especially : a person who emigrates for political reasons

Examples of émigré in a Sentence

He was one of a group of Soviet émigrés living in New York. the revolution resulted in a flood of émigrés into neighboring countries
Recent Examples on the Web Lincoln settled for a compromise authorizing private financing that still provided impoverished emigres with money to cross the ocean. Harold Holzer, New York Daily News, 4 July 2024 Any attempt to reconstruct a national Ukrainian narrative must take a stand on a trauma of such proportions–especially since all Soviet historians, propagandists, and officials assiduously ignored the famine or dismissed it as an emigre delusion for decades. The Editors, JSTOR Daily, 23 Feb. 2024 The son of Soviet emigres who settled in New Jersey, Gershkovich was fluent in Russian and moved to the country in 2017 to work for The Moscow Times newspaper before being hired by the Journal in 2022. CBS News, 13 June 2024 Most were emigres from Texas who brought their politics to El Monte. Patt Morrison, Los Angeles Times, 12 Apr. 2024 The son of Soviet emigres who settled in New Jersey, Gershkovich moved to Russia in 2017 to work for The Moscow Times newspaper before being hired by the Journal in 2022. Emma Burrows, Quartz, 28 Mar. 2024 The son of Soviet emigres who settled in New Jersey, Mr. Gershkovich moved to Russia in 2017 to work for The Moscow Times newspaper before being hired by the Journal in 2022. Emma Burrows, The Christian Science Monitor, 28 Mar. 2024 Other emigres were of the same generation and background, like Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who created the orchestra soundtrack at the dawn of talkies. Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times, 28 Feb. 2024 Born to two Soviet Jewish emigres, Gershkovich grew up in New Jersey, speaking Russian at home. Caroline Guthrie, ABC News, 29 Sep. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'émigré.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French émigré, from past participle of émigrer to emigrate, from Latin emigrare

First Known Use

1792, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of émigré was in 1792

Dictionary Entries Near émigré

Cite this Entry

“émigré.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/%C3%A9migr%C3%A9. Accessed 14 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

émigré

noun
émi·​gré
variants also emigré
ˈem-i-ˌgrā How to pronounce émigré (audio)
ˌem-i-ˈgrā
: emigrant sense 1
especially : a person forced to emigrate for political reasons
Etymology

French

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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