tire

21 ENTRIES FOUND:

1tire

verb \ˈtī(-ə)r\
tiredtir·ing

Definition of TIRE

intransitive verb
:  to become weary
transitive verb
1
:  to exhaust or greatly decrease the physical strength of :  fatigue
2
:  to wear out the patience of :  bore

Origin of TIRE

Middle English tyren, from Old English tēorian, tȳrian
First Known Use: before 12th century

Synonym Discussion of TIRE

tire, weary, fatigue, exhaust, jade, fag mean to make or become unable or unwilling to continue. tire implies a draining of one's strength or patience <the long ride tired us out>. weary stresses tiring until one is unable to endure more of the same thing <wearied of the constant arguing>. fatigue suggests great lassitude from excessive strain or undue effort <fatigued by the day's chores>. exhaust implies complete draining of strength by hard exertion <shoveling snow exhausted him>. jade suggests the loss of all freshness and eagerness <appetites jaded by overindulgence>. fag implies a drooping with fatigue <shoppers all fagged out by the Christmas rush>.

2tire

noun

Definition of TIRE

1
obsolete :  attire
2
archaic :  a woman's headband or hair ornament

Origin of TIRE

Middle English, short for attire
First Known Use: 14th century

Rhymes with TIRE

3tire

transitive verb
tiredtir·ing

Definition of TIRE

1
obsolete :  attire
2
archaic :  to adorn (the hair) with an ornament

First Known Use of TIRE

14th century

4tire

noun, often attributive

Definition of TIRE

1
:  a metal hoop forming the tread of a wheel
2
:  a rubber cushion that fits around a wheel (as of an automobile) and usually contains compressed air

Origin of TIRE

Middle English, probably from 2tire
First Known Use: 15th century

Other Automotive Terms

articulated, block, choke, clutch, diesel, neutral, transmission

tire

verb \ˈtī(ə)r\   (Medical Dictionary)
tiredtir·ing

Medical Definition of TIRE

intransitive verb
: to become weary
transitive verb
: to exhaust or greatly decrease the physical strength of : fatigue

tire

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Rubber cushion that fits around a wheel and usually contains compressed air. Solid-rubber tires were used on road vehicles until they were replaced by air-filled pneumatic tires, which, although first patented by Robert Thomson (1822–1873) in 1845, came into common use only when John Dunlop (1840–1921) put them on bicycles in 1888 and the French manufacturer Michelin began to produce them for motor vehicles. The tire consisted of an inner tube containing compressed air that was covered by an outer rubber casing to provide traction. In the 1950s tubeless tires became standard on most automobiles. Improved tire construction produced the radial-ply tire.

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