Dictionary

1stem

noun \ˈstem\

Definition of STEM

1
a :  the main trunk of a plant; specifically :  a primary plant axis that develops buds and shoots instead of roots
b :  a plant part (as a branch, petiole, or stipe) that supports another (as a leaf or fruit)
c :  the complete fruiting stalk of a banana plant with its bananas
2
a :  the main upright member at the bow of a ship
b :  the bow or prow of a ship — compare stern
3
:  a line of ancestry :  stock; especially :  a fundamental line from which others have arisen
4
:  the part of an inflected word that remains after the inflected part is removed <strength is the stem of strengths>; also :  root 6
5
:  something held to resemble a plant stem: as
a :  a main or heavy stroke of a letter
b :  the short perpendicular line extending from the head of a musical note
c :  the part of a tobacco pipe from the bowl outward
d :  the cylindrical support of a piece of stemware (as a goblet)
e :  a shaft of a watch used for winding
from stem to stern

Origin of STEM

Middle English, from Old English stefn, stemn stem of a plant or ship; akin to Old High German stam plant stem and probably to Greek stamnos wine jar, histanai to set — more at stand
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Botany Terms

annual, burgeon, chloroplast, nomenclature, succulent, sylvan, xylem

Rhymes with STEM

2stem

transitive verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

1
:  to make headway against (as an adverse tide, current, or wind)
2
:  to check or go counter to (something adverse)
stem·mer noun

Origin of STEM

Middle English (Scots) stemmen to keep a course, from 1stem (of a ship)
First Known Use: 1593

3stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

transitive verb
1
:  to remove the stem from
2
:  to make stems for (as artificial flowers)
intransitive verb
:  to occur or develop as a consequence :  have or trace an origin <her success stems from hard work>
stem·mer noun

Origin of STEM

1stem (of a plant)
First Known Use: 1724

Synonym Discussion of STEM

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging <an idea that springs to mind>. arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent <new questions have arisen> <slowly rose to prominence>. originate implies a definite source or starting point <the fire originated in the basement>. derive implies a prior existence in another form <the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast>. flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception <words flowed easily from her pen>. issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet <blood issued from the cut>. emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (as a thought) from a source <reports emanating from the capital>. proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause <advice that proceeds from the best of intentions>. stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development <industries stemming from space research>.

4stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

transitive verb
1
a :  to stop or dam up (as a river)
b :  to stop or check by or as if by damming; especially :  stanch <stem a flow of blood>
2
:  to turn (a ski) in stemming
intransitive verb
1
:  to restrain or check oneself; also :  to become checked or stanched
2
:  to slide the heel of one ski or of both skis outward usually in making or preparing to make a turn

Origin of STEM

Middle English stemmen to dam up, from Old Norse stemma; akin to Middle High German stemmen to dam up and probably to Lithuanian stumti to shove
First Known Use: 14th century

5stem

noun

Definition of STEM

1
:  check, dam
2
:  an act or instance of stemming on skis

First Known Use of STEM

1700

STEM

abbreviation

Definition of STEM

science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
STEMMING Defined for Kids

1stem

noun \ˈstem\

Definition of STEM for Kids

1
:  the main stalk of a plant that develops buds and shoots and usually grows above ground
2
:  a thin plant part (as a leafstalk) that supports another part <a cherry's stem>
3
:  the bow of a ship
4
:  the basic part of a word to which prefixes or suffixes may be added
5
:  something like a stalk or shaft <the stem of a goblet> <… Henry and Jake both pushed the stems of their stopwatches down … — Walter Farley, The Black Stallion>
from stem to stern
:  in or to every part :  thoroughly

2stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM for Kids

1
:  to make progress against <The boat was able to stem the current.>
2
:  to check or hold back the progress of <New safety rules stemmed the increase in accidents.>

3stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM for Kids

1
:  to develop as a consequence of <His illness stems from an accident.>
2
:  to come from :  derive <The word “misty” stems from “mist.”>
3
:  to remove the stem from <stem cherries>

4stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM for Kids

:  to stop or check by or as if by damming <We were able to stem the flow of blood.>

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