stem

66 ENTRIES FOUND:

1stem

noun \ˈstem\

Definition of STEM

1
a :  the main trunk of a plant; specifically :  a primary plant axis that develops buds and shoots instead of roots
b :  a plant part (as a branch, petiole, or stipe) that supports another (as a leaf or fruit)
c :  the complete fruiting stalk of a banana plant with its bananas
2
a :  the main upright member at the bow of a ship
b :  the bow or prow of a ship — compare stern
3
:  a line of ancestry :  stock; especially :  a fundamental line from which others have arisen
4
:  the part of an inflected word that remains after the inflected part is removed <strength is the stem of strengths>; also :  root 6
5
:  something held to resemble a plant stem: as
a :  a main or heavy stroke of a letter
b :  the short perpendicular line extending from the head of a musical note
c :  the part of a tobacco pipe from the bowl outward
d :  the cylindrical support of a piece of stemware (as a goblet)
e :  a shaft of a watch used for winding
from stem to stern

Origin of STEM

Middle English, from Old English stefn, stemn stem of a plant or ship; akin to Old High German stam plant stem and probably to Greek stamnos wine jar, histanai to set — more at stand
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Botany Terms

annual, burgeon, chloroplast, nomenclature, succulent, sylvan, xylem

Rhymes with STEM

2stem

transitive verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

1
:  to make headway against (as an adverse tide, current, or wind)
2
:  to check or go counter to (something adverse)
stem·mer noun

Origin of STEM

Middle English (Scots) stemmen to keep a course, from 1stem (of a ship)
First Known Use: 1593

3stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

transitive verb
1
:  to remove the stem from
2
:  to make stems for (as artificial flowers)
intransitive verb
:  to occur or develop as a consequence :  have or trace an origin <her success stems from hard work>
stem·mer noun

Origin of STEM

1stem (of a plant)
First Known Use: 1724

4stem

verb
stemmedstem·ming

Definition of STEM

transitive verb
1
a :  to stop or dam up (as a river)
b :  to stop or check by or as if by damming; especially :  stanch <stem a flow of blood>
2
:  to turn (a ski) in stemming
intransitive verb
1
:  to restrain or check oneself; also :  to become checked or stanched
2
:  to slide the heel of one ski or of both skis outward usually in making or preparing to make a turn

Origin of STEM

Middle English stemmen to dam up, from Old Norse stemma; akin to Middle High German stemmen to dam up and probably to Lithuanian stumti to shove
First Known Use: 14th century

5stem

noun

Definition of STEM

1
:  check, dam
2
:  an act or instance of stemming on skis

First Known Use of STEM

1700

STEM

abbreviation

Definition of STEM

science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

stem

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Plant axis that emerges from the roots, supports the branches, bears buds and shoots with leaves, and contains the vascular (conducting) tissues (xylem and phloem) that transport water, minerals, and food to other parts of the plant. The pith (a central core of spongy tissue) is surrounded by strands (in dicots; see cotyledon) or bundles (in monocots) of conducting xylem and phloem, then by the cortex and outermost epidermis, or bark. The cambium (an area of actively dividing cells) lies just below the bark. Lateral buds and leaves grow out of the stem at intervals called nodes; the intervals on the stem between the nodes are called internodes. In flowering plants, various stem modifications (rhizome, corm, tuber, bulb, stolon) let the plant survive dormantly for years, store food, or sprout asexually. All green stems perform photosynthesis, as do leaves; in plants such as the cacti (see cactus) and asparagus, the stem is the chief site of photosynthesis.

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