rap

3 ENTRIES FOUND:

1rap

noun \ˈrap\

Definition of RAP

1
:  a sharp blow or knock
2
a :  a sharp rebuke or criticism
b :  a negative and often undeserved reputation or charge —often used with bum or bad <given a bum rap by the press>
3
a :  the responsibility for or adverse consequences of an action <refused to take the rap>
b :  a criminal charge
c :  a prison sentence

Origin of RAP

Middle English rappe
First Known Use: 14th century

Rhymes with RAP

2rap

verb
rappedrap·ping

Definition of RAP

transitive verb
1
:  to strike with a sharp blow
2
:  to utter suddenly and forcibly
3
:  to cause to be or come by raps <rap the meeting to order>
4
:  to criticize sharply
intransitive verb
1
:  to strike a quick sharp blow
2
:  to make a short sharp sound

First Known Use of RAP

14th century

3rap

verb
rapped also rapt \ˈrapt\ rap·ping

Definition of RAP

transitive verb
1
:  to snatch away or upward
2
:  enrapture

Origin of RAP

back-formation from rapt
First Known Use: 1599

4rap

noun

Definition of RAP

:  a minimum amount or degree (as of care or consideration) :  the least bit <doesn't care a rap>

Origin of RAP

perhaps from 1rap
First Known Use: 1834

5rap

verb
rappedrap·ping

Definition of RAP

intransitive verb
1
:  to talk freely and frankly
2
:  to perform rap music

Origin of RAP

perhaps from 1rap
First Known Use: 1929

6rap

noun

Definition of RAP

1
:  talk, conversation; also :  a line of talk :  patter
2
a :  a rhythmic chanting often in unison of usually rhymed couplets to a musical accompaniment
b :  a piece so performed

First Known Use of RAP

1967

rap

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Musical style in which rhythmic and/or rhyming speech is chanted (“rapped”) to musical accompaniment. This backing music, which can include digital sampling (music and sounds extracted from other recordings), is also called hip-hop, the name used to refer to a broader cultural movement that includes rap, deejaying (turntable manipulation), graffiti painting, and breakdancing. Rap, which originated in African American communities in New York City, came to national prominence with the Sugar Hill Gang's “Rapper's Delight” (1979). Rap's early stars included Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Run-D.M.C., LL Cool J, Public Enemy (who espoused a radical political message), and the Beastie Boys. The late 1980s saw the advent of “gangsta rap,” with lyrics that were often misogynistic or that glamorized violence and drug dealing. More recent stars have included Sean “Puffy” Combs, Jay-Z, OutKast, and Eminem.

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