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1

preterit

adjective pret·er·it \ˈpre-tə-rət\

Definition of preterit

archaic

  1. :  bygone, former



Variants of preterit

or

preterite

play \ˈpre-tə-rət\

Origin and Etymology of preterit

Middle English preterit, from Anglo-French, from Latin praeteritus, from past participle of praeterire to go by, pass, from praeter beyond, past, by (from comparative of prae before) + ire to go — more at for, issue


First Known Use: 14th century


2

preterit

noun pret·er·it

Definition of preterit



Did You Know?

The original form of this word, which dates to Middle English, has no final "e," but preterite, as it appears in our second example, is another accepted styling of the word. Like many technical linguistic terms, preterit is ultimately Latin in origin: it comes from praeter, meaning "beyond, past, by." (This meaning is also apparent in the now-archaic adjectival use of preterit to mean "bygone" or "former.") Another word from praeter is preternatural, from the Latin phrase praeter naturam, meaning "beyond nature." That word is typically used to describe what is so unusual or extraordinary as to seem outside of what can be accounted for by nature.

14th Century

First Known Use of preterit

14th century

Variants of preterit

or

preterite


Learn More about preterit

  1. Spanish Central: Translation of preterit


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