Dictionary

mutiny

noun mu·ti·ny \ˈmyü-tə-nē, ˈmyüt-nē\

: a situation in which a group of people (such as sailors or soldiers) refuse to obey orders and try to take control away from the person who commands them

plural mu·ti·nies

Full Definition of MUTINY

1
obsolete :  tumult, strife
2
:  forcible or passive resistance to lawful authority; especially :  concerted revolt (as of a naval crew) against discipline or a superior officer
mutiny intransitive verb

Examples of MUTINY

  1. The mutiny was led by the ship's cook.
  2. The sailors staged a mutiny and took control of the ship.

Origin of MUTINY

mutine to rebel, from Middle French (se) mutiner, from mutin mutinous, from meute revolt, from Vulgar Latin *movita, from feminine of movitus, alteration of Latin motus, past participle of movēre to move
First Known Use: 1540

Other Nautical Terms

avast, aweigh, flotsam, jib, keel, lee, port, starboard, stay

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