Quantcast
Merriam-Webster Logo
  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
  • Scrabble
  • Spanish Central
  • Learner's Dictionary
1

jettison

play
noun jet·ti·son \ˈje-tə-sən, -zən\

Definition of jettison

  1. :  a voluntary sacrifice of cargo to lighten a ship's load in time of distress



Examples of jettison in a sentence

  1. <with his ship rapidly sinking, the captain ordered a last-ditch jettison of much of its cargo>



Origin and Etymology of jettison

Middle English jetteson, from Anglo-French geteson, literally, action of throwing, from Latin jactation-, jactatio, from jactare — more at jet


First Known Use: 15th century

Other Nautical Terms


2

jettison

verb jet·ti·son

Simple Definition of jettison

  • : to drop (something) from a moving ship, airplane, etc.

  • : to get rid of (something) : to reject (something, such as a plan or idea)

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of jettison

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1 :  to make jettison of

  3. 2 :  to get rid of as superfluous or encumbering :  omit or forgo as part of a plan or as the result of some other decision <must be prepared to jettison many romantic notions — Christopher Catling>

  4. 3 :  to drop from an aircraft or spacecraft in flight

jettisonable

play \-sə-nə-bəl, -zə-\ adjective

Examples of jettison in a sentence

  1. The captain gave orders to jettison the cargo.

  2. They jettisoned the fuel and made an emergency landing.

  3. We should jettison these old computers and get new ones.

  4. They jettisoned plans for a vacation.



Did You Know?

Jettison comes from the Anglo-French noun geteson, meaning "action of throwing," and is ultimately from the Latin verb jactare, meaning "to throw." The noun jettison ("a voluntary sacrifice of cargo to lighten a ship’s load in time of distress") entered English in the 15th century; the verb has been with us since the 19th century. The noun is also the source of the word jetsam ("jettisoned goods"), which is often paired with flotsam("floating wreckage"). These days you don’t have to be on a sinking ship to jettison something. In addition to literally "throwing overboard," jettison means simply "to get rid of." You might jettison some old magazines that are cluttering your house. Or you might make a plan but jettison it at the last minute, as in our example sentence.

1848

First Known Use of jettison

1848

Other Nautical Terms


JETTISON Defined for Kids

jettison

play
verb jet·ti·son \ˈje-tə-sən\

Definition of jettison for Students

jettisoned

jettisoning

  1. :  to throw out especially from a ship or an airplane <Cargo was jettisoned.>





Seen and Heard

What made you want to look up jettison? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a very small amount

Get Word of the Day daily email!

WORD GAMES

Take a 3-minute break and test your skills!

alphabet-pasta-spelling-help

Which is the correct spelling?

acommodate accommodate accomodate acommadate
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ