flaunt


flaunt

verb \ˈflnt, ˈflänt\

: to show (something) in a very open way so that other people will notice

: to show a lack of respect for (something, such as a rule)

Full Definition of FLAUNT

intransitive verb
1
:  to display or obtrude oneself to public notice <a great flaunting crowd — Charles Dickens>
2
:  to wave or flutter showily <the flag flaunts in the breeze>
transitive verb
1
:  to display ostentatiously or impudently :  parade <flaunting his superiority>
2
:  to treat contemptuously <flaunted the rules — Louis Untermeyer>
flaunt noun
flaunt·ing·ly \ˈfln-tiŋ-lē, ˈflän-\ adverb
flaunty \-tē\ adjective

Usage Discussion of FLAUNT

Although transitive sense 2 of flaunt undoubtedly arose from confusion with flout, the contexts in which it appears cannot be called substandard <meting out punishment to the occasional mavericks who operate rigged games, tolerate rowdyism, or otherwise flaunt the law — Oscar Lewis> <observed with horror the flaunting of their authority in the suburbs, where men … put up buildings that had no place at all in a Christian commonwealth — Marchette Chute> <in our profession … very rarely do we publicly chastise a colleague who has flaunted our most basic principles — R. T. Blackburn, AAUP Bulletin>. If you use it, however, you should be aware that many people will consider it a mistake. Use of flout in the sense of flaunt 1 is found occasionally <“The proper pronunciation,” the blonde said, flouting her refined upbringing, “is pree feeks” — Mike Royko>.

Examples of FLAUNT

  1. She liked to flaunt her wealth by wearing furs and jewelry.
  2. They openly flaunted the rules.

Origin of FLAUNT

perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse flana to rush around
First Known Use: 1566

Rhymes with FLAUNT

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