Dictionary

1fain

adjective \ˈfān\

Definition of FAIN

1
archaic :  happy, pleased
2
archaic :  inclined, desirous
3
a :  willing <he was very fain, for the young widow was “altogether fair and lovely…” — Amy Kelly>
b :  being obliged or constrained :  compelled <Great Britain was fain to devote its whole energy … to the business of slaying and being slain — G. M. Trevelyan>

Examples of FAIN

  1. <during the Renaissance most men of science and the arts were fain to express their noblest thoughts in Latin, the lingua franca of the learned>

Origin of FAIN

Middle English fagen, fayn, from Old English fægen; akin to Old English gefēon to rejoice, Old High German gifehan, Old Norse feginn happy
First Known Use: before 12th century

2fain

adverb

Definition of FAIN

1
:  with pleasure :  gladly <a speech of fire that fain would blaze — Michael Billington>
2
a :  by preference <knew it, too, though he would fain not admit it publicly — John Lukacs>
b :  by desire <I would fain consult you — W. S. Gilbert>

Examples of FAIN

  1. <I would fain not marry that suitor, my lord, the princess pleaded>

First Known Use of FAIN

12th century

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3 ENTRIES FOUND:
Next Word in the Dictionary: fainaiguePrevious Word in the Dictionary: faimlyAll Words Near: fain
July 05, 2015
bunkum Hear it
insincere or foolish talk
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