emotion


emo·tion

noun \i-ˈmō-shən\

: a strong feeling (such as love, anger, joy, hate, or fear)

Full Definition of EMOTION

1
a obsolete :  disturbance
b :  excitement
2
a :  the affective aspect of consciousness :  feeling
b :  a state of feeling
c :  a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body

Examples of EMOTION

  1. a display of raw emotion
  2. The defendant showed no emotion when the verdict was read.
  3. She was overcome with emotion at the news of her friend's death.

Origin of EMOTION

Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move
First Known Use: 1579

Other Psychology Terms

fetish, hypochondria, intelligence, mania, narcissism, neurosis, pathological, psychosis, schadenfreude, subliminal

emo·tion

noun \i-ˈmō-shən\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of EMOTION

1
: the affective aspect of consciousness
2
: a state of feeling
3
: a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body—compare affect
emo·tion·al \-shnəl, -shən-əl\ adjective
emo·tion·al·i·ty \-ˌmō-shə-ˈnal-ət-ē\ noun, plural emo·tion·al·i·ties
emo·tion·al·ly \-ˈmō-shnə-lē, -shən-əl-ē\ adverb

emotion

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Affective aspect of consciousness. The emotions are generally understood as representing a synthesis of subjective experience, expressive behaviour, and neurochemical activity. Most researchers hold that they are part of the human evolutionary legacy and serve adaptive ends by adding to general awareness and the facilitation of social communication. Some nonhuman animals are also considered to possess emotions, as first described by Charles Darwin in 1872. An influential early theory of emotion was that proposed independently by William James and Carl Georg Lange (1834–1900), who held that emotion was a perception of internal physiological reactions to external stimuli. Walter B. Cannon questioned this view and directed attention to the thalamus as a possible source of emotional content. Later researchers have focused on the brain-stem structure known as the reticular formation, which serves to integrate brain activity and may infuse perceptions or actions with emotional valence. Cognitive psychologists have emphasized the role of comparison, matching, appraisal, memory, and attribution in the forming of emotions. All modern theorists agree that emotions influence what people perceive, learn, and remember, and that they play an important part in personality development. Cross-cultural studies have shown that, whereas many emotions are universal, their specific content and manner of expression vary considerably.

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