cram


1cram

verb \ˈkram\

: to fill (something) so that there is no room for anything else : to fill (something) completely

: to push or force (someone or something) into a space that is tight or crowded

: to push or force yourself into a space that is tight or crowded

crammedcram·ming

Full Definition of CRAM

transitive verb
1
:  to pack tight :  jam <cram a suitcase with clothes> <a novel crammed with surprises>
2
a :  to fill with food to satiety :  stuff
b :  to eat voraciously :  bolt <the child crams her food>
3
:  to thrust in or as if in a rough or forceful manner <crammed the letters into his pocket>
4
:  to prepare hastily for an examination <cram the students for the test>
intransitive verb
1
:  to eat greedily or to satiety :  stuff
2
:  to study a subject intensively especially for an imminent examination
cram·mer noun

Examples of CRAM

  1. He crammed the suitcase with his clothes.
  2. Before the trip I crammed my head with information about Spain.

Origin of CRAM

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; akin to Old Norse kremja to squeeze
First Known Use: before 12th century

2cram

noun

: a quick period of study in order to learn a lot of information quickly for a test, exam, etc.

Full Definition of CRAM

1
:  a compressed multitude or crowd :  crush
2
:  last-minute study especially for an examination

Examples of CRAM

  1. <battling the rush-hour cram in the subway>

First Known Use of CRAM

1810

Cram

biographical name \ˈkram\

Definition of CRAM

Donald James 1919–2001 Am. chem.

Cram

biographical name

Definition of CRAM

Ralph Adams 1863–1942 Am. architect & author

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