verb \ˈwāv\

: to officially say that you will not use or require something that you are allowed to have or that is usually required


Full Definition of WAIVE

transitive verb
archaic :  give up, forsake
:  to throw away (stolen goods)
archaic :  to shunt aside (as a danger or duty) :  evade
a :  to relinquish voluntarily (as a legal right) <waive a jury trial>
b :  to refrain from pressing or enforcing (as a claim or rule) :  forgo <waive the fee>
:  to put off from immediate consideration :  postpone
[influenced by 1wave] :  to dismiss with or as if with a wave of the hand <waived the problem aside>
:  to place (a ball player) on waivers; also :  to release after placing on waivers

Examples of WAIVE

  1. She waived her right to a lawyer.
  2. The university waives the application fee for low-income students.

Origin of WAIVE

Middle English weiven to decline, reject, give up, from Anglo-French waiver, gaiver, from waif lost, stray — more at waif
First Known Use: 14th century

Synonym Discussion of WAIVE

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely. relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness <relinquished her crown>. yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force <the troops yielded ground grudgingly>. resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle <resigned her position>. surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist <surrendered their claims>. abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up <abandoned all hope>. waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion <waived the right to a trial by jury>.
WAIVED Defined for Kids


verb \ˈwāv\

Definition of WAIVE for Kids

:  to give up claim to


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