tower

50 ENTRIES FOUND:

1tow·er

noun \ˈta(-ə)r\

: a tall, narrow building or structure that may stand apart from or be attached to another building or structure

: a tall piece of furniture used to store something

computers : a personal computer that stands in an upright position

Full Definition of TOWER

1
:  a building or structure typically higher than its diameter and high relative to its surroundings that may stand apart (as a campanile) or be attached (as a church belfry) to a larger structure and that may be fully walled in or of skeleton framework (as an observation or transmission tower)
2
:  a towering citadel :  fortress
3
:  one that provides support or protection :  bulwark <a tower of strength>
4
:  a personal computer case that stands in an upright position
tow·ered \ˈta(-ə)rd\ adjective
tow·er·like \ˈta(-ə)r-ˌlīk\ adjective

Examples of TOWER

  1. <a hill from which one can gaze upon the towers of that great and historic city>

Origin of TOWER

Middle English tour, tor, from Old English torr & Anglo-French tur, tour, both from Latin turris, from Greek tyrris, tyrsis
First Known Use: before 12th century

2tower

intransitive verb

Definition of TOWER

1
:  to reach or rise to a great height
2
:  to exhibit superior qualities :  surpass <her intellect towered over the others'>

First Known Use of TOWER

15th century

tower

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Any freestanding or attached structure that is relatively tall in proportion to its base. The Romans, Byzantines, and medieval Europeans built defensive towers as part of the fortifications of their city walls (e.g., the Tower of London). Indian temple architecture uses towers of various types (e.g., the sikhara). Towers were an important feature of churches and cathedrals built in the Romanesque and Gothic periods. Some Gothic church towers were designed to carry a spire; others had flat roofs. The Italian campanile could either be attached to a church or freestanding. The use of towers declined somewhat during the Renaissance but reappeared in Baroque architecture. The use of steel frames enabled buildings to reach unprecedented heights; the Eiffel Tower in Paris was the first structure to reveal the true vertical potential of steel construction.

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